For 30 years, Kathy Margolis was a primary school teacher in Brisbane, Australia. "This year, after much thought, I have decided to look for another job, not easy for a woman in her 50s," she wrote on Facebook on Monday. "I cannot continue to do a job that requires me to do what is fundamentally against my philosophy of how it should be done." Her criticisms of the competitive, anxiety-provoking education system down under seem to apply to American education, too.

Kathy and sons. She commented on her post, "My boys would have been in trouble under these circumstances too."
Kathy and sons. She commented on her post, "My boys would have been in trouble under these circumstances too."
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The post has over 28,000 shares, promoting a discussion about education worldwide.

To all my teaching buddies and all my friends with school age kids, I've written a letter on your behalf to the editor...

Posted by Kathy Margolis on Monday, February 1, 2016

First, she explains how the system both takes advantage of teachers and denies them professional autonomy:

Education in Australian schools is in crisis and someone has to listen to those who are game enough to speak up. I have been a primary school teacher in Brisbane schools for over 30 years. This year, after much thought, I have decided to look for another job, not easy for a woman in her 50s. I cannot continue to do a job that requires me to do what is fundamentally against my philosophy of how it should be done. I love my students and they love me. I know how to engage children in learning and how to make it fun. It’s what I do best. 
Teachers have very little professional autonomy anymore. We are told what to do, how to do it and when it has to be done by. Never have I experienced a time in my profession where teachers are this stressed and in real fear for the mental health of not only themselves, but the children that they teach. The pressures are enormous. And before we get the people who rabbit on about our 9 to 3 day and all the holidays we get, let’s get some things straight. No teacher works from 9 until 3. We are with the students during those hours. We go on camps, we man stalls at fetes, we conduct parents/teacher interviews, we coach sporting teams and we supervise discos. And of course there is the lesson preparation, the marking, the report cards. Full time teachers are paid 25 hours a week. Yes you read that correctly, 25 paid hours a week. In any other job that would be considered part time. So now that I have justified our holidays, many of which are spent doing the above, let’s talk about what is going on in classrooms across this great nation of ours.

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Sources: Facebook: Kathy Margolis