"Duh," say millions of creative people around the world, before they immediately go back to working on deadlines.

You can tell that they're artists because they're wearing scarves. (via Thinkstock)


Jobs: most of us have to have one, because otherwise we'd spend most of our time building shelter and growing food instead of paying other people to do those things for us. And for those of us creative types, some of us are lucky enough to get jobs that actually align with our artistic pursuits, working as writers, designers, musicians, and so on. But those creative jobs are still jobs, and with those jobs come deadlines, which are THE DEADLIEST OF ALL LINES.*

Well, according to a recent interview with neuroscientist John Kounios in the Washington Post, those deadlines are killing our precious creativity. While this is probably zero surprise to any even vaguely creative person, the nice thing about this Q&A is that it puts it into sciencey, researchy, newspapery terms, which I assume bosses are more likely to listen to than me explaining "but I need more time to write the thing like it should be written."

Here's what Kounios said about deadlines:

We also found that having a deadline, which carries with it the implicit threat of a negative consequence if you don't meet it, can create anxiety and shift your cognitive strategy into a more analytical mode of thought. Deadlines can increase analytical productivity, but if an employer really needs something outside the box, innovative and original, maybe a soft target date would encourage more creativity.
Sources: h/t NY Mag | Washington Post