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Amanda Seyfried is the latest celebrity to get real about living with mental illness. The actress opened up about her obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in an interview with Allure (she's on the November cover) and criticized the stigma that keeps people silent about mental health issues, which affect millions of Americans.

The discussion began when Seyfried said she chose to not install a stove in the guest house of her home in upstate New York (she was afraid it could burn down) because of her OCD. The 30-year-old actress said she has been taking Lexapro, an anti-anxiety medication, to treat the disorder since she was 19.

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“I’m on the lowest dose. I don’t see the point of getting off of it," she said about Lexapro. "Whether it’s placebo or not, I don’t want to risk it. And what are you fighting against? Just the stigma of using a tool?”

Society has been slow to accept that mental illnesses, like anxiety and depression, are legitimate health issues and need to be treated just like physical illnesses such as diabetes or cancer. Seyfried phrased it perfectly to Allure:

A mental illness is a thing that people cast in a different category [from other illnesses], but I don’t think it is. It should be taken as seriously as anything else. You don’t see the mental illness: It’s not a mass; it’s not a cyst. But it’s there. Why do you need to prove it? If you can treat it, you treat it.

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The actress said she first realized she had a problem when her OCD-related anxiety convinced her she had a brain tumor (fortunately she didn't). She was referred to a psychiatrist and now, thanks to therapy and medication, said she's doing much better. “As I get older, the compulsive thoughts and fears have diminished a lot," she said. "Knowing that a lot of my fears are not reality-based really helps.”

In recent years, more celebs have opened up about their mental health struggles, like Lena Dunham (OCD) and Demi Lovato (bipolar disorder, eating disorders and addiction). Their stories serve as a reminder that there is nothing weird or shameful about mental illness. So props to Seyfried for being as down-to-earth and real as her Mean Girls character wasn't.

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Sources: Allure