Smashing Pumpkins singer Billy Corgan goes on long-winded rant lamenting the fact he can't say the N-word. The 90s are dead.

Smashing Pumpkins singer Billy Corgan goes on long-winded rant lamenting the fact he can't say the N-word. The 90s are dead.
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Billy Corgan—the Smashing Pumpkins frontman who was probably a guy you once respected and kind of liked if you were alive in the 90s and were, like, very suburban—is angry that he can't say the N-word because of damn politically correct college students. 

Said Corgan, who is apparently a libertarian and also 49 despite sounding like a smart but insufferable undergrad in your political science class:

The tactics in the social-justice warrior movement are to stifle and shut down free speech. And I would argue in the world that I live in, which is the bareknuckle world, they're leveraging their position because they don't have power.

It's pretty remarkable that I could say one word right now that would destroy my career. I could use the wrong racial epithet or say the wrong thing to you or look down at the wrong part of your body and be castigated and it's a meme and I'm a horrible person. Every day through the media, through advertising, we see people being degraded, we see people doing all sorts of things that we should be horrified at as a culture. So we've normalized all sorts of things, but we live in a world where one word could destroy your life but it's OK to, if you're a social-justice warrior, spit in somebody's face.

You try to tell someone here who you might argue is taking advantage of our social welfare system or is gaming the system somehow and say, ‘Look, you're telling me America sucks and you're spitting on the flag, try living in one of these third world countries and see how far that gets you. It's always very interesting to me when you see the way gays and lesbians are treated in some other countries in the world. If [American protesters] have that level of vitriol for, let's say, Donald Trump as a candidate – because they feel it's antithetical to what they believe in – where is the five-times greater condemnation for those societies that are treating their people far worse than just ideas and words?

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During the bolded part of Corgan's speech, the screen shows images of Paula Deen and Michael Richards, both of whom were criticized for using the N-word.

He also isn't a fan of Bernie Sanders, as you can imagine:

I can’t believe that we’re even having this discussion, if you can understand when I say that to you humbly. To be talking in America in 2016 about Mao is a good idea, and a socialist is running for president and that’s OK, and we’re going to go back to these kind of crazy tax rates where we’re going to completely disempower the innovators in the country because the new class, the new technocratic class wants to keep their position and they want to keep anybody else from coming in the game… I mean, it’s just crazy to me.

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And he doesn't like people protesting Donald Trump, probably because Trump could very well put "white people should be allowed to say the 'N-word'" in the Republican party platform:

I have no respect for what these people are doing. I don't. They're shutting down free speech, they're shutting down processes that... I just don't get it. To me, it's antithetical to the society that I believe in. As I said on Alex's show, they're eventually going to come after me. It's just the way history works.

Obviously, there's a nugget of truth somewhere in all this about free speech, but no, Corgan, you probably can't say the N-word and not be lambasted for it. You haven't been able to get away with that since the 60s—think of Elvis Costello calling Ray Charles and James Brown the N-word all the way back in 1979, and how that one drunken moment has followed him to this day. Speaking of 1979, let's just remember the good times:

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