Advertising

The NRA likes to say that the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun, is a good guy with a gun (LOL that has really worked). While it would take a whole article and a few shots of whiskey for me to unpack why I disagree with the NRA's adage, I will say, the only way to stop a comedian on Twitter is another comedian on Twitter. There's no point in leveraging "good guy" or "bad guy" labels with comedians, since they're mostly amoral alcoholics. So, let's just say, it takes two to tango on Twitter and comedians match each other's level of dancing skill.

Advertising

It all started when Bojack Horseman's Paul F. Tompkins poked fun at New Zealand's voting mascot on Twitter.

Okay, that IS a horrifying voting mascot. How is this supposed to be persuasive?! Is this a subtle threat to the people of New Zealand?! Like, "hey, if you don't vote this ORANGE CREATURE WILL EAT YOUR CHILDREN." Or maybe, the citrus golem is supposed to be cute and the designer was going through some sh*t. The world may never know the emotional depths of the origin story, but that's not what Tompkins is here for anyways. Tompkins is here to make jokes and watch it all burn.

Advertising

Upon seeing the tweet, New Zealand native and beloved Flight of the Conchords comedian Jemaine Clement retaliated with fire.

This of course, made Americans on Twitter weep. After all, many of us are desperately trying to erase Trump's presidency from our mind in order to cope.

Unsurprisingly, Twitter loved the interaction between the comedians.

Advertising

The sparring match left some people speechless.

Much like the deeply embarrassing results of election day.

Most importantly, Twitter needed this level of petty today.

Sometimes you need a breather from all of the despair inducing breaking news. Reflecting on the horror of New Zealand's orange golem voting mascot is one way to breathe. That is, until you're reminded of the orange golem Trump who sits in the White House.

Advertising

Can we just vote Tompkins and Clement into office already?! Or at least, make them the voting mascots for the U.S. and New Zealand respectively.