George Takei wrote a powerful message on Facebook to the mayor who praised Japanese internment.

George Takei wrote a powerful message on Facebook to the mayor who praised Japanese internment.
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George Takei, the true king of Facebook, uses his influence and reach for good. When not hilariously "trololololol"-ing, he writes important open letters you couldn't possibly "dislike." This past Wednesday, November 18th, Takei responded to an extremely dumb mayor who had the audacity, and lack of historical insight, to say that internment of Japanese citizens during World War II was a good thing, and a possible strategy for incoming refugees.

George Takei wrote a powerful message on Facebook to the mayor who praised Japanese internment.
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Takei himself spent four years with his family living in a prison camp during World War II, and used his insight to shed light on this issue and take down this ridiculous claim.

 

Earlier today, the mayor of Roanoke, Virginia, Mr. David A. Bowers, in the attached letter, joined several state...

Posted by George Takei on Wednesday, November 18, 2015
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He writes,

Earlier today, the mayor of Roanoke, Virginia, Mr. David A. Bowers, in the attached letter, joined several state governors in ordering that Syrian refugees not receive any government assistance, or be relocated to their jurisdiction. Apart from the lack of legal authority to do so (under the Refugee Act of 1980, only the President has authority to accept or deny refugees), his resort to fear-based tactics, and his galling lack of compassion for people fleeing these same terrorists, Mayor Bowers made the following startling statement:

“I’m reminded that Franklin D. Roosevelt felt compelled to sequester Japanese foreign nationals after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and it appears that the threat of harm to America from Isis now is just as real and serious as that from our enemies then.”

Mayor Bowers, there are a few key points of history you seem to have missed:

1) The internment (not a "sequester") was not of Japanese "foreign nationals," but of Japanese Americans, two-thirds of whom were U.S. citizens. I was one of them, and my family and I spent 4 years in prison camps because we happened to look like the people who bombed Pearl Harbor. It is my life’s mission to never let such a thing happen again in America.

2) There never was any proven incident of espionage or sabotage from the suspected “enemies” then, just as there has been no act of terrorism from any of the 1,854 Syrian refugees the U.S. already has accepted. We were judged based on who we looked like, and that is about as un-American as it gets.

3) If you are attempting to compare the actual threat of harm from the 120,000 of us who were interned then to the Syrian situation now, the simple answer is this: There was no threat. We loved America. We were decent, honest, hard-working folks. Tens of thousands of lives were ruined, over nothing.

Mayor Bowers, one of the reasons I am telling our story on Broadway eight times a week in Allegiance is because of people like you. You who hold a position of authority and power, but you demonstrably have failed to learn the most basic of American civics or history lessons. So Mayor Bowers, I am officially inviting you to come see our show, as my personal guest. Perhaps you, too, will come away with more compassion and understanding.

-- George Takei

Learn more about our show here: www.allegiancemusical.com

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A+, Takei. It seems like many people need you to school them not only in history, but in humanity (and also in promoting Broadway musicals). 

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