Artist writes viral letter to Taylor Swift after she stole her foxy drawing.

Artist writes viral letter to Taylor Swift after she stole her foxy drawing.
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An artist in New Orleans is putting Taylor Swift on blast for stealing a drawing of hers without credit or compensation. Taylor Swift—the perpetually surprised pop star, goddess of female friendship, and keeper of the squad—made a stir last year when she single-handedly got Apple Music to pay artists for streaming their stuff. However, she seems to be less sympathetic to visual artists.

This isn't the first time Swift was called out for being a hypocrite: back in June, a photographer revealed that Taylor Swift's company retains ownership of any pictures taken at her live shows. This means that for a small one-time fee, Swift's team can use anyone's photos in perpetuity.

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Sorry, not sorry.
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In November 2014, T-Swift shared one of her lyrics next to Burguieres' signature drawing of a fox on Facebook, crediting another artist who had blatantly stolen it.

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Burgieres posted a follow-up letter on Friday, after Swizzy's team said they'd pay her, but only if she'd donate the money to charity, which is difficult to shake off.

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She writes,

Dear Taylor Swift:

I am a professional artist. With years of work and support from customers, friends, and family, I have built a business around my designs and am (hopefully) adding my own small form of beauty to the world. I now have three shops in New Orleans and gratefully rely on people who demonstrate that art they love is worth paying for. I may "only" have 1239 followers on Instagram, but I believe my work has value. I believe there are many others out there like me.

As a professional artist, I was astonished to see you use one of my most popular designs on all your official social media platforms as part of your promotions for 1989. While I wondered why no one had sought permission or offered compensation to do so, I recognized that such endorsement is a once-in-a-lifetime boost for an artist and can skyrocket an artist’s career. Friends congratulated me and customers expressed joy. But congratulations turned to confusion. The design was a copy, and with someone else’s name signed to it.

I was devastated, but I took solace in thinking that someone so outspoken about artists’ rights would willingly fix her mistake. Mistakes are easy to make; I thought if you only KNEW about the error, you would do what is in your power to make it right. I was wrong. My efforts to combat the pirated and unauthorized copy (and your use and distribution of it to millions of people) were noticed, as you removed the post after several days. But the copy had been shared and downloaded countless times, and it seemed neither you nor your team intended on correcting your mistake.

After months of effort, I received an offer from you and your team that mentions no credit to me as the artist of the design, but does include payment of a “four-figure” amount, with the stipulation that I must donate it all. Taylor, as a professional, would you agree to such terms from Apple, or Spotify? My work is my living—it is how I pay bills and support my family and employees. Many of your fans are professional artists, and support themselves and their families with earnings from their intellectual property. Would you really profit from and distribute a copy of their work to millions of people, and then tell them they don’t deserve professional recognition or compensation?

I don’t know what will come of this letter, but for the sake of my own business and on behalf of independent artists like myself, I had to speak up. I have no ill will toward you, and I appreciate the theoretical virtue of your stance as a defender of art and intellectual property. I simply hope to see your actions fall more in line with the values you claim to hold.

Sincerely,
Ally Burguieres
www.Cocoally.com

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It's not too late to apologize. Or, you know, pay her for real.
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