Louis CK accuser describes the devastating backlash she received after speaking out.

Louis CK accuser describes the devastating backlash she received after speaking out.
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If you thinks it sucks to find out that your favorite celebrity sexually harassed someone, imagine how it feels to be the person who was sexually harassed.

Rebecca Corry, a comedian and writer who spoke publicly about Louis C.K. asking to masturbate in front of her when they were shooting a pilot that she wrote, wrote an essay for Vulture about how life has been since she came forward.

A few years ago, Corry received an apology email from C.K., in which he accidentally admit to even more sexual misconduct.

In the six months since her story was published in The New York Times, Corry says that "it’s become clear that many people have no understanding of just how extensive and complicated the ramifications of what C.K. did have been, and continue to be. They didn’t end the day it happened and won’t end any time soon for me, a comedian who has now spoken out against one of her own."

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Posted by Rebecca Corry on Wednesday, April 18, 2018
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Corry explains that "the day Louis C.K. asked to masturbate in front of me on the set of the TV show we were shooting, I was put on an unspoken 'list' I never asked or wanted to be on." Being on that "list" did not help her career as a comedian, actress, and writer:

For 12 years, I actively tried to not be part of the C.K. masturbation narrative. But no matter how hard I tried, it kept finding me — at work-related events, on TV sets, social settings, and comedy clubs. I’d hear people defending him while unabashedly tearing apart the women who’d tried to bring what he was doing to light. It angered me and felt shameful to sit in silence, but I did, because I didn’t want to be a part of it.

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Since she stopped being silent, Corry has received a lot of hate on Twitter, including death threats. Friends "simply stopped communicating" with her, and others refused to use their names to corroborate her story in the Times.

The hypocrisy is stunning: "These are the same people I had seen on social media, proudly wearing pussy hats and Time’s Up pins at the Women’s March," she explains.

Corry also addresses the rumors that C.K. is in the process of staging a "comeback," writing that "comeback" is an incorrect word:

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The idea that C.K. reentering the public eye would ever be considered a “comeback” story is disturbing. The guy exploited his position of power to abuse women. A “comeback” implies he’s the underdog and victim, and he is neither. C.K. is a rich, powerful man who was fully aware that his actions were wrong. Yet he chose to behave grotesquely simply because he could. The only issue that matters is whether he will choose to stop abusing women.

To all the women who have suffered sexual harassment, Corry offers this advice:

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...follow your heart, and do it for you. The truth won’t make a wrong right...Not ​everyone will respect your truth, and you may suffer further for telling it. But the truth will set you free​.

Read the whole piece over at Vulture.

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