Advertising

On Friday, President Trump signed an executive order that has closed the U.S. borders to refugees from around the world, as well as placed a temporary suspension on immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries, the New York Times reports. President Trump said the action intends to keep out "radical Islamic terrorists," when in actuality, it's a xenophobic and bigoted law that sends a message of hate, intolerance and fear to the rest of the world. One of the recent realizations of the ban's effect is that Oscar-nominated Iranian director Asghar Farhadi will not be able to attend this year's ceremony.

Advertising

According to The Telegraph, Farhadi was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film for The Salesman, which tells the story of a man seeking revenge on an intruder who attacked his wife while she was alone in their apartment. This isn't Farhadi's first trip to the Academy Awards, either. His film A Separation won two awards in 2012: Best Foreign Language Film (which made it the first Iranian movie to win the award) as well as Best Original Screenplay. In his 2012 speech he spoke of what the award meant to his country, saying that Iranians were celebrating a moment when their rich culture was not shrouded in politics, and war, as it so often is.

Advertising

In the wake of last year's #OscarsSoWhite outrage, many people are hoping that The Academy to speak out on the incident, but knowing that the dusty old elites that comprise The Academy generally hate to make waves, it's hard to predict what will happen, if anything. Farhadi's story is a case in which it makes obvious that this ban reduces other countries to stereotypes and deepening the divides between the Middle East and the U.S. Unfortunately in our world, it's easier to feel upset over an acclaimed artist being denied entry into the U.S. than a regular person, because we value celebrity. But hopefully Farhadi will serve as an example that will resonate, even though a human life should not be measured or made valid by its contribution to society.

Advertising

When we assume that people who are Muslims are threats, we ignore the vast amount of humanity that exists within these countries and assume the worst of places that are teeming with life that is no more or less valuable than the Christian lives that the ruling gives precedent to. It makes clear that when you attempt to ban terrorists by making blanket assumptions about a culture or religion, you stop many other things in their tracks as well. Consider this one of many wake up calls that hopefully celebrities and Hollywood can use to stand up to President Trump.

Sources: The Telegraph | New York Times