5 rave reviews for the new childhood-ruining Ghostbusters.

5 rave reviews for the new childhood-ruining Ghostbusters.
Advertising

IT'S HAPPENING. The anticipation for the new Ghostbusters movie, with *gasp* an all-female cast, had angry nerds all over the Internet freaking out. They're certain that this reboot will ruin their perfect childhoods with its depiction of women fighting ghosts.

Sorry boys, but the critics have spoken and they are loving the new Ghostbusters, estrogen and all! Overall, they say it's fun, doesn't take itself too seriously, and that it's a lot like the original Ghostbusters—just as funny, but with a few less Y chromosomes. And the four stars bring the heat.

Advertising

Here are five reviews that make us even more excited to watch Kate McKinnon, Leslie Jones, Kristen Wiig, and Melissa McCarthy kick some serious ghost ass this summer and ruin all of your childhoods.

//cdn.someecards.com/posts/screen-shot-2016-07-12-at-124851-pm-48HRHn.png
Byeeeeee, childhoods!

USA Today praises the chemistry of the four leads.

The casting of four women as the new Ghostbusters has drawn praise and criticism, but there’s no denying the comedic chops of the actresses donning the trademark tan jumpsuits. They play off each other well, with McKinnon’s Jillian Holtzmann a clear standout, mixing brainiac daftness with a touch of flirty naughtiness that would have made Bill Murray’s Peter Venkman proud. Jones’ Patty Tolan, the subway worker who joins the team, is just as smart and a little more grounded than her wraith-wrestling colleagues.

Advertising

Empire: it's "fun, funny and full of energy."

The new Ghostbusters provoked so much online wrath that the first trailer even won the dubious title of being the most disliked video on YouTube. But the film cleverly fights back at this hatred and its misogynist undertones, according to this review from Empire:

This gender-focused trolling is something the movie plays on. Our new team of Ghostbusters post video evidence of one of the first ghosts they encounter, and the disbelieving comments (“Ain’t no bitches gonna hunt no ghosts”) mirror the real life ones the filmmaking team were besieged with. When Melissa McCarthy’s Abby Yates tells Kristen Wiig’s Erin Gilbert, “You shouldn’t be reading this stuff, it’s just a list of what crazy people write in the middle of the night online,” it’s difficult to disagree.

Advertising

Overall, Empire gave the film three stars. Sure, it's not five. But they definitely didn't hate it, or see the dearth of Y chromosomes as any problem whatsoever:

An effectively spooky opening gives way to a film that’s fun, funny and full of energy. It’s almost as if it never mattered that the four main characters were women. Strange that.

Strange indeed.

Advertising

People: the movie "takes the haters head-on."

Despite rousing an "an internet boo-fest of near-supernatural proportions," People Magazine says "Paul Feig and his undeniably hilarious cast of leading ladies deserve the last laugh." Even if it's got some flaws, it makes up for them with light-hearted goofiness and fun:

That wacky vibe makes for a film that never takes itself too seriously and helps cover up for other disappointments (like a poorly developed villain). The result is a movie seemingly self-aware that its heroes' biggest obstacle is entertaining the audience, not defeating the nominal bad guy. One scene, in which the Ghostbusters crack jokes about YouTube comment trolls, takes the haters head-on.

But why bother hating? It's easier to just climb aboard the Ecto-1 and have a good time.

Advertising

Time: if you hate it on principle, you're an "unimaginative schmuck."

No one has to love Paul Feig’s new Ghostbusters, or even like it. But anyone who continues to stand against it on principle—“My childhood has been defiled! I don’t like its stars! The trailer was bad!”—is an unimaginative schmuck. Because Feig’s Ghostbusters is its own definitive creature, an affable, inventive riff on Ivan Reitman’s proton-packing caper that exists not to score points, but only to make us laugh. For a summer comedy, there’s no nobler purpose.

Advertising

Again, this review echoes other critics who say the film doesn't take itself seriously. And neither should you:

It’s all presented with a wink—there’s nothing heavy-spirited or assaultive about this Ghostbusters. Feig, who co-wrote the script with Katie Dippold(The Heat), has clearly taken great care with the movie’s tone—it’s as delicately balanced as the wings of a spectral butterfly. He honors the spirit of the original: Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Ernie Hudson and Annie Potts all have cameos, and a gleaming bronze bust of the late Harold Ramis graces the hallowed halls of Columbia University, where part of that Ghostbusters, like this one, takes place. Yet there’s little that’s nostalgic, in the musty sense, about Feig’s reimagined ghostbusting universe: The movie glows with vitality, thanks largely to the performers, who revel in one another’s company, and not in a self-congratulatory, Ocean’s Twelve-style, “We’re awesome movie stars, together” way.

Advertising

The New York Times: "Girls Rule. Women Are Funny. Get Over It."

Can I get an aaaaaaaaaaaa(wo)-men?

Sliding into theaters on a river of slime and an endless supply of good vibes, the new, cheerfully silly “Ghostbusters” is that rarest of big-studio offerings — a movie that is a lot of enjoyable, disposable fun. And enjoy it while you can because this doesn’t happen often, even in summer, which is supposed to be our season of collective moviegoing happiness. The season when everyone jumps onboard (whee!) and agrees that, yes, this great goof is exactly what you were thinking when you wondered why they didn’t make summer movies like they used to.

Oh, wait, because whatever else you can say about the new “Ghostbusters,” it’s a lot like the old “Ghostbusters,” except that it stars four funny women instead of, you know, four funny men. In other words, it doesn’t have a lot of XY chromosomes and basso profondo voices, though its token hottie, played by a game, nimbly funny Chris Hemsworth, pulls his weight on both those counts. Otherwise, the redo is pretty much what you might expect from Paul ​Feig, one of the best things to happen to American big-screen comedy since Harold Ramis.

Advertising

The Times applauds the "real comedy chemistry and emotionally fleshed-out performances" of the leads, and says the movie more than survived the dreaded remake curse: "As it turns out, the original “Ghostbusters” is one of those durable pop entertainments that can support the weight of not only a lesser follow-up (the 1989 sequel “Ghostbusters II”), but also a gender redo."

What's that sound?? Oh, just The New York Times dropping the mic.

According to these critics at least, this movie seems like a fun time. If you're willing to let yourself enjoy it and get over the fact that yes, in 2016, women can fight ghosts (or do literally anything else, because it's a movie about ghosts).

Advertising

RIP all of your childhoods.

Advertising