David Bowie's producer says that Bowie's final album was intended to be a good-bye.

David Bowie's producer says that Bowie's final album was intended to be a good-bye.
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David Bowie, the best f*cking human, died yesterday at the age of 69, a very Bowie number, after an 18 month battle with cancer. Just two days before, he released the album Blackstar (technically spelled ​"★​" because David Bowie does not need language), to rave reviews. And now, his producer Tony Visconti is saying that his last masterpiece was, indeed, a goodbye message from the pop genius.

He always did what he wanted to do. And he wanted to do it his way and he wanted to do it the best way. His death was...

Posted by Tony Visconti on Monday, January 11, 2016

The Facebook post reads:

He always did what he wanted to do. And he wanted to do it his way and he wanted to do it the best way. His death was no different from his life - a work of Art. He made Blackstar for us, his parting gift. I knew for a year this was the way it would be. I wasn't, however, prepared for it. He was an extraordinary man, full of love and life. He will always be with us. For now, it is appropriate to cry.

 In particular, people are singling out the first two singles from Blackstar, "Blackstar" and "Lazarus," as specifically being about Bowie telling the world that he expected to die soon, with lyrics like "Something happened on the day he died / His spirit rose a meter and stepped aside" and "Look up here, I’m in heaven." Imagine: this artist knew he was going to die and decided to spend his last months making something gorgeous.

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Here are the music videos for both songs, which further hint at themes of illness, death, unfinished work... and resurrection. 

"Lazarus"

"Blackstar"

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