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Spoilers for Game of Thrones, season 7 below.

Why bring back Beric Dondarrion? It's the question Thoros of Myr must ask every time he brings the eyepatched lord back from the dead, and the question an avid fan has to ask now that only eight more episodes of Game of Thrones remain.

What purpose does Beric Dondarrion—who's been brought back to life by the will of Thoros and the Lord of Light so many times—serve for the show? Now that the enigmatic rebel is marching past the wall with Westeros' Suicide Squad, one theory is that Dondarrion won't survive the journey.

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Of course, he'll be brought back to the land of the living—but this time, not by the Lord of Light. Via the must-read Reddit forum r/Asoiaf, a user named Hockeyfox writes:

Every time Beric has been raised from the dead by Thoros, he has wondered why the Lord of Light keeps bringing him back. After the premier of "Eastwatch," Beric's final purpose has become abundantly clear.

He is going to be the wight that Jon Snow brings back from the North!

Think about it, Beric's whole arc has been him grappling with his purpose as basically a Light zombie. Wouldn't it be poetic that he end up sacrificing himself to save his comrades and thus reanimates as an ice wight? Then, Jon captures him and brings him south. This would mean his purpose in living in a continuous cycle of life and death would be to be brought back one last time as living (or more appropriately unliving) proof to Dany and Cersei that the white walkers really exist! What are you're thoughts?

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So in desperation for a real, live (dead) Wight to convince Cersei of the dangers of the North, the Westorosi avengers will turn to one of their own fallen comrades, most likely killed in that terrifying battle teased by the trailer for episode six.

Jon Snow will ask Thoros if he plans to revive the fallen Dondarrion, Thoros will decline, and rather than burn the corpse, they'll chain up the zombie Beric and take him to King's Landing.

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It's an interesting theory, certainly. And even if it doesn't come true—it definitely offers a possible conclusion for this northern adventure. Why eat out when you can stay in? Why capture a Wight when you can make your own?

If it's not Beric, how about Jorah? His heart's about to freeze over anyway.