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Hands down, The Great British Baking Show is the best show on Netflix. If you are not familiar with The Great British Baking Show (known as The Great British Bake Off in the U.K.), let me break it down for you:

Twelve amateur—but very talented—bakers compete over the course of 10 weeks to be named the United Kingdom's best baker. Unlike most American competition shows, GBBS is not exactly "cut-throat"; it has a very supportive vibe thanks to the show's hosts, Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins, and the judges, Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood. At the end of every competition, a winner will be crowned, no one will be stabbed in the back, and everyone eats way too many carbs.

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Sure, on paper The Great British Baking Show doesn't sound crazy exciting. But that is just what fans love about it: the unconventional environment of support, the quirky British-ness of the contestants, and of course, sugary food porn.

And Mary Berry, but of course!
And Mary Berry, but of course!
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Lucky Brits are spoiled with several seasons of Bake Off, as well as a plethora of companion shows with a similar structures like The Great British Sewing Bee (the sewing version of the show), The Big Allotment Challenge (the gardening version of the show), and The Great Pottery Throw Down (the pottery version of the show). However, it is next to impossible to watch those shows stateside. So, here are six programs you can watch in the U.S. that may be able to fill that Paul Hollywood-sized hole in your heart.

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1. Escape to the Country

After I finished The Great British Baking Show, I thought no other program would be able to capture that chillaxed, comforting, almost-mundane British feeling the show gave me. Then I discovered Escape to the Country. On this program, prospective buyers search for homes in the British countryside, learning about the history of the area as they go. It is like House Hunters, but you won't hate every single person on it. Give it a few episodes and you will be hooked.

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2. Call the Midwife

Alright, when I first told a friend I was watching Call the Midwife, she said, "My grandma loves that show!" Luckily for me, a grandmother's mark of approval is all I need to know that I am going to be into something. This BBC show focuses on the trials and tribulations of a group of midwives in 1950s-era East End London. No, they don't (usually) bake cakes, but if you enjoy the history, drama, and the other meaning of "having a bun in the oven," this show is for you.

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3. The Great British Baking Show Masterclass

Okay, no brainer. The Great British Baking Show Masterclass is basically Paul and Mary baking things that contestants have attempted to make in the past, just much, much better. Yeah, they're basically just showing off at this point. Still, you get to watch Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood work their magic in the kitchen and show you how it's done. Seriously, I will watch Mary Berry do pretty much anything at this point—she can read the phone book to me in her adorable accent for all I care.

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Paul Hollywood ain't too bad either, I guess.

4. Doc Martin

Doc Martin is what you get if you mix together Monk, House, and The Great British Baking Show—a program that is entertaining, endearing, and quirky as hell. The show follows Dr. Martin Ellingham after he leaves his busy London practice to become a general practitioner in the quiet seaside village of Portwenn. As the uptight doctor interacts with the loony villagers (there really must be something in the water there), the doctor manages to get himself in a bevy of crazy situations.

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5. Masterchef Jr.

Okay, not a British show at all, but there is a case to be made for Gordon Ramsay's Masterchef Jr. because he is British. When Chef Ramsay usually hosts a cooking show, it dissolves into an anxiety-inducing screaming match between the host and the contestants. For example, Hell's Kitchen, Ramsay's popular competition show is pretty much the exact opposite of The Great British Baking Show.

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Yet the terrifying Gordon Ramsay transforms into a giant cuddly teddy bear when interacting with children, creating a similar nurturing environment to the one fostered on GBBS. Just check out this clip below.

6. The Next Great Baker

Lastly, there is the TLC show The Next Great Baker. Similar to GBBS, on this show amateur bakers compete under the watchful eye of experienced cake designers. However, instead of the mild-mannered hosts and judges of GBBS, the bakers compete under Buddy "Cake Boss" Valastro, a performative Italian from New Jersey who seems to always be flummoxed. The Next Great Baker has drama, fights, feuds, stress, and eliminations that involve getting shipped off in a box truck. So, yeah, pretty much the only thing it has in common with GBBS is cake.

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Of course, nothing can really measure up to the unique awesomeness of The Great British Baking Show...except maybe more seasons of The Great British Baking Show.

Netflix, get on that please?