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Real news show Full Frontal with Samantha Bee​ explored the how the "fake news" sausage gets made on their latest episode Monday night. Although many are realizing a bit retroactively that fake news definitely threw a wrench into the 2016 election, it is never too late to realize that the things you share on your Facebook actually are void of validity. Hooray!

Full Frontal correspondent Michael Rubens went directly to the source and interviewed a fake news purveyor who wrote multiple fake stories defaming Hillary Clinton. Who did he vote for, by the way? Hillary Clinton. Yep, perhaps your unhinged, Breitbart-loving Uncle was right all along— liberals are the worst.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXQyaUkg6eA

So what is "fake news"? This is a catch-all term for everything from propaganda to conspiracies theories that are spread, mostly through social media, to perpetuate lies. These fabrications feed into a specific ideology targeted at a certain demographic, and ultimately further a fictitious narrative by telling the reader exactly what they want to hear.

For example, here is a tweet about a fake news story sent out by Trump's National Security Advisor's son that prompted a man with a gun to show up at a pizza shop in North Carolina.

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And liberals are definitely not off the hook, either, so you can stop your impassioned Facebook rant about how stupid conservatives are right now. From "Occupy Democrats" to "Bipartisan Report," fake news panders to the gullible folks on the left just as easily.

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So why does one make fake news? The answer, of course, is money. Here is an excerpt from an article run in The Washington Post entitled, "This is how Facebook’s fake-news writers make money."

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How much money can you bring in by making stuff up and putting it on the Internet? “I make like $10,000 a month from AdSense,” Paul Horner, a prolific, Facebook-focused fake-news writer told us this week. And among a growing group of Macedonian teenagers who see fake-news sites as a way to make easy money from American gullibility, the most successful can make about $5,000 a month, BuzzFeed reported.

Yep, the bulk of your fake news is being created by a bunch of Macedonian teens who are looking to make a quick buck. And they weren't the only international group who was responsible for the spread of completely baseless "reporting." According to The Washington Post, Russia also did their part to ensure fake news stories go viral.

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Russia’s increasingly sophisticated propaganda machinery — including thousands of botnets, teams of paid human “trolls,” and networks of websites and social-media accounts — echoed and amplified right-wing sites across the Internet as they portrayed Clinton as a criminal hiding potentially fatal health problems and preparing to hand control of the nation to a shadowy cabal of global financiers. The effort also sought to heighten the appearance of international tensions and promote fear of looming hostilities with nuclear-armed Russia.

Although the President-elect is trying very hard to denounce the validity of the press and fact-based reporting (which is something that most dictators also like to do when they rise to power, by the way), remain vigilant in your effort to consume a well-balanced media diet that, you know, is actually real.

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A real thing this fake news lover has said on camera. Don't be like him.
A real thing this fake news lover has said on camera. Don't be like him.
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