Bernie Sanders explains the best and worst case scenarios of a Trump presidency.

Bernie Sanders explains the best and worst case scenarios of a Trump presidency.
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Bernie Sanders stopped by The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Monday to rapturous applause. Promising Colbert he still felt "optimistic" about the country after an election season that sent him to 46 states (which sad four states did he snub?), Sanders laid out the best case scenario for Trump's America. And the worst.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=331&v=vf_XrfpdOsM

"What you do now is get involved heavily in the political process. When millions of people stand up and fight back, we will not be denied," Sanders told Colbert.

"The best case scenario is that Trump is not an ideologue... his views are all over the place. The good news is, that when millions of people say to him, you know, 'Mr. Trump, what you're talking about is nuts, let's not move in that direction,' he may actually hear those things."

As for the worst case, Sanders laid out a reality that might terrify loyalists from both parties, in which a Trump White House and a GOP controlled House, Senate, and Supreme Court unite to "change the rules of the game" so they cease to lose elections.

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At this, a pall fell over the crowd, as Bernie described a way for the Republicans to "control this government indefinitely."

The vibe from the crowd seemed to be: "Shh, Bernie. Don't give them any ideas."

Sanders also spent much of his conversation on an autopsy of the Democratic Party and "where do we go from here?"

"Hillary Clinton ended up with two million more votes than Donald Trump. So don't see this as a massive success for Trump, he lost the popular vote," he began. Still, said Sanders, changes to the party are necessary.

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"The truth is, Democrats should not be losing to a candidate who insults so many people, who wants to give huge tax breaks to the top two tenths of one percent, and who rejects climate change."

Note here that Sanders and Trump share one thing in common, and it is their pronunciation of the word "yuge."

"How are we losing these elections? Something is fundamentally wrong and what I'm trying to do right now is bring about structural changes in the Democratic Party so it becomes a grassroots party."

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