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Just to remind yourself, Google what a bike looks like. You couldn't draw one like that. One designer, named Gianluca Gimini, is capitalizing on that complete failure of would-be artists and engineers to accurately draw a bicycle. Gimini took all the bicycle sketches he could find and turned them into the following digital renderings. Here's what some amateur designs would look like if actually brought to life:

Not bad, but where are the pedals?
Not bad, but where are the pedals?

Gimini got the designs by asking numerous friends and strangers alike to draw a bike for his "Velocipedia" project. The 3D illustrations that follow prove, as you might have guessed, that a majority of humans lack the knowledge of simple mechanics.

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These bikes would break.

No support for the chain, here.
No support for the chain, here.
You'll need some really long arms to steer this bicycle.
You'll need some really long arms to steer this bicycle.
The frame design would make the bicycle hard to steer, to say the least.
The frame design would make the bicycle hard to steer, to say the least.

As you can see from the photos, these folks tend to sketch the same parts of a bike wrong. For the most part, they nail the frame, but when it comes to the bike’s chain and gear, they can't seem to grasp the concept. 

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The flaws are sort of hard to see on a two-dimensional sketch, but when you take a look at their 3D versions, the mistakes become more apparent.

Can't ride on a loose chain.
Can't ride on a loose chain.
The same goes for this bike.
The same goes for this bike.
This bicycle almost looks rideable, although you'll have to sit right  next to the handlebars.
This bicycle almost looks rideable, although you'll have to sit right  next to the handlebars.
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Gimini told Someecards his inspiration for the project. He was chilling at a bar in Bologna, Italy with a friend back in 2009. He said they were reminiscing about school time memories and at one point, Gimini recalled this very embarrassing moment:

A classmate was being questioned by our technical education teacher. He was doing pretty bad and was on the verge of tears at a certain point, so the teacher tried to help him out by asking him to describe his bicycle. The poor kid panicked and couldn’t even remember if the driving wheel was the front or the rear one.  My friend laughed at this story and said that anyone who has ridden a bike must know how it’s made. Then he tried drawing one on a napkin and miserably failed. 

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And that was the day he started collecting the bike drawings.

These are some impressive wheels.
These are some impressive wheels.
The middle part would probably go kaploosh after a few rides.
The middle part would probably go kaploosh after a few rides.
Kaploosh goes the middle on this bike frame as well.
Kaploosh goes the middle on this bike frame as well.

Gimini emphasized that "the purpose of the renderings is just to underline how beautiful the sketches are. All the so called creativity in this project lies in the sketches."

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Yes, the designer certainly puts these avant garde drawings in a positive light, but the man has a point. His overall message? "We can all be imaginative if we allow ourselves to be it."

Basically, who cares if your drawing isn't an accurate depiction of a bicycle? At least you're drawing. As long as you don't try to ride it.