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On Monday, anyone who visited the Google homepage found themselves looking at a doodle of Fred Korematsu, a Japanese-American famous for fighting Japanese internment. It would be his 98th birthday.

Korematsu fled his San Leandro, California home in 1942 rather than submit to the executive order that demanded the imprisonment of Americans of Japanese descent in internment camps, according to the Huffington Post. After being captured, he appealed his conviction, taking the case to the Supreme Court.

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There, the highest court in the nation ruled 6-3 against him. Via the Huffington Post, here's the writing of the dissenting justices:

"It is the case of convicting a citizen as a punishment for not submitting to imprisonment in a concentration camp, based on his ancestry, and solely because of his ancestry, without evidence or inquiry concerning his loyalty and good disposition towards the United States,” they wrote.

“If this be a correct statement of the facts disclosed by this record, and facts of which we take judicial notice, I need hardly labor the conclusion that Constitutional rights have been violated.”

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It's not hard to see the allusion to Donald Trump's own executive order, banning travel to the United States to everyone from seven Muslim-majority countries. Calls to rescind the more recent executive action echo that dissenting opinion from 1944, which criticized the move as "solely because of... ancestry, without evidence or inquiry concerning... loyalty and good disposition towards the United States."

Said Senator Chuck Schumer on Sunday: "The president wants people to believe that everyone's a terrorist or a criminal who's an immigrant. It's not fair and it's not right."

Also worth noting is that Monday is not just Korematsu's birthday, it's Franklin D. Roosevelt's (the very president who signed the internment executive action). Google chose to feature Korematsu.

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According to USA Today, Google created a $4 million crisis fund to benefit those affected by Trump's ban. Google co-founder Sergey Brin was also spotted at protests at the San Francisco International Airport.