Science just confirmed the thing you hate most about your friends' texts is in fact annoying.

Science just confirmed the thing you hate most about your friends' texts is in fact annoying.
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According to a 2016 study followed up with newly published research by Binghamton University, you're right to feel like you've done something terribly wrong whenever a friend responds to your text with accurate punctuation.

Scientifically, there's nothing more passive aggressive than a period (unless you're too old to get it, then you're exempt).

Science just confirmed the thing you hate most about your friends' texts is in fact annoying.

In the abstract for the study, the professors explain that "the inclusion of a period after a positive one-word response (e.g., yeah.) led readers to perceive the response as less sincere."

Because why in the world would you ever need to officially end your one-word sentence with punctuation? You're not being thorough, you're being petty. You're absolutely furious that your friend is running late and you want to ruin their day with a quick and effective dot.

Case in point (pun intended):

Science just confirmed the thing you hate most about your friends' texts is in fact annoying.

God that's cold. Binghamton professor Celia Klin explains why being grammatically correct isn't the nicest way to communicate, via Binghamton.edu:

In formal writing, such as what you'd find in a novel or an essay, the period is almost always used grammatically to indicate that a sentence is complete.

With texts, we found that the period can also be used rhetorically to add meaning.

Specifically, when one texter asked a question (e.g., I got a new dog. Wanna come over?), and it was answered with a single word (e.g., yeah), readers understood the response somewhat differently depending if it ended with a period (yeah.) or did not end with a period (yeah).

This was true if the response was positive (yeah, yup), negative (nope, nah) or more ambiguous (maybe, alright).

We concluded that although periods no doubt can serve a grammatical function in texts just as they can with more formal writing -- for example, when a period is at the end of a sentence -- periods can also serve as 'textisms', changing the meaning of the text.

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Besides the passive aggressive period, the new research determined something else you already know: that using "emoticons, irregular spellings (sooooo) and irregular use of punctuation (!!!)" can add and change meaning to make a message feel more positive. Those types of creative grammar nuances stand in for the "tone of voice and pauses" that we use in face-to-face conversation.

Obviously.

Sorry, that was rude. TBH, this study is suuuuper validating.

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