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Luxury retailer Net-a-Porter is in hot water over a slipup on their online catalog that inadvertently revealed how they use Photoshop to retouch images of their models. The incident happened on the listing for their Maria La Rosa Sailor Man socks. As you can see below, some hapless webmaster accidentally uploaded a version of the photo with annotations instructing the graphic designer on how to retouch it.

The Photoshop is offensive, but not as offensive as $43 for a pair of socks.
The Photoshop is offensive, but not as offensive as $43 for a pair of socks.

The image in question features a model named Amelia wearing the socks. Here's a closeup:

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Who cares if the bag gets slimmed? You can barely see the socks!
Who cares if the bag gets slimmed? You can barely see the socks!

On the image, blue lines seem to target areas that the company wants reduced. At least one is labeled "Please, slim."

Of course, Net-a-Porter quickly fixed the mistake. Currently, the product page displays the image without annotations (or Photoshop, interestingly).

Did they get shamed out of retouching the image? Or did they realize this model is already skinny?
Did they get shamed out of retouching the image? Or did they realize this model is already skinny?

A spokesman for Net-a-Porter apologized, and explained the error.

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We post images that accurately represent the garments so that customers receive product they expect. This image was uploaded to our product page in error and the notes refer exclusively to the garments.

There are a couple problems with that explanation. One: the ad is for socks. Why would they be retouching the other items? Two: how does photoshopping images of your clothes help you "accurately represent" them?

If nothing else, this story demonstrates how insidiously photo retouching has crept into every facet of our lives. It's a cruel irony that the same technology that makes memes so hilarious is also used to make us feel bad about our bodies.