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Sometimes feeling good about how you look on the outside will help you feel a little better on the inside. This certainly seemed to be the case for one woman in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

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Kate Langman, a hairstylist at The Salon inside Ulta Beauty, noticed a woman filling her cart with multiple items meant to soften and detangle hair. She asked the woman if she could help her with anything, and after talking for a bit, the customer revealed that she suffered from severe depression. Due to her mental illness, she stopped washing and combing her hair, and would lay in bed for months at a time. As a result, she ended up with a large matted knot that Langman described as a "rock on the back of her head."

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I work at The Salon inside Ulta Beauty. About a month ago, I saw this women pulling every product off the "All Soft" Redken line. When I asked her if she needed any help, she began to tell me her story. A very long story short, this women suffered with a very deep depression. She couldn't get out of her bed for 6 months. Which meant she didn't wash her hair or brush it. She kept pulling it back into this bun which after that long of time turned into a huge dread lock. The bun was so matted that it felt like she literally had rock on the back of her head. This is when I mentioned to just put all the product back on the shelf. We made an appointment for the following day and she didn't show up. She then called about 2 weeks later and booked another appointment. And once again, no showed. At this point I figured she wasn't going to ever end up coming in. It actually, kind of, broke my heart. I wanted to help her so much.

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My second home 💕

A post shared by kate langman🍦☕️✂️💛 (@katelyn2xx) on

After not showing up to either of her two scheduled hair appointments, Langman thought she would not ever see the woman again. But lo and behold, the woman returned and was finally ready to sit down in Langman's chair.

So today, out of alllll days, she comes walking in and asked if she can get her hair done today, and that she finally got herself out of bed again. I, of course, said yes. I didn't care how late I stayed, I wanted to make sure she got taken care of. She wanted to keep it on the longer side if it was at all possible. Most of the time the advice is to just cut it off..But I wanted to make this work for her. I wanted her to know how hard I was going to try to make her feel great again. I explained to her prices and she said "I don't care about the price, I just want to look like myself again." I spent 8 1/2 hours with this girl. 4 1/2 hours of combing, and 3 hours coloring and 1/2 hour for the cut. All of this time, I'm just telling myself to keep going.. that this is going to be all so worth it.

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And it was! The results of the eight hours of labor speaks for itself.

*feel free to share!💕 So here's the long story very short. I work at The Salon inside Ulta Beauty. About a month ago, I...

Posted by Kate Langman on Wednesday, March 8, 2017

But the haircut didn't just transform the client on the outside, it transformed her on the inside as well. In the end, experience seemed to be just as profound for Langman as it was for her client.

By the end of this service, I could see the sparkle in her eyes and I could see her cheeks get rosy pink from the excitement of not only being able to run her fingers through her hair again, but she felt herself again. I changed someone's life today.. & I'll never ever forget it.
& if this ever makes its way back to her, I want her to know how great, wonderful, kind, loving, and how strong of a person she is. And not only those things, but how beautiful she is.. she deserves nothing but happiness.. & I'm so thankful and so grateful I got to help with her first step.

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Langman concluded her post with en emphatic "I LOVE MY DAMN CAREER," and we can certainly can understand why.

Of course, one haircut is not going to cure anyone's serious mental health issues, but the Langman is hoping that the new hairdo gave her client the confidence to start the recovery process. Sometimes it takes a little push, or a little snip, to start taking those first steps.