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Potato chips give us much. They fulfill our needs for both crunchy foods and salty foods. They delight party guests. They sometimes look like things they shouldn't look like. Oh, and they can also locate cancer in its early, treatable stages.

Kristine Moore alongside one of the world's top diagnosticians.
Kristine Moore alongside one of the world's top diagnosticians.

Kristine Moore of Marysville, Washington, told KLTV News that in February she was eating some Ruffles in her bagged lunch, something she's done nearly every day for the past 20 years. But despite her loyalty, one of those Ruffles stabbed her hard in the throat. It hurt all day, and when her husband took a look, it was his amateur medical opinion that her tonsils looked swollen and had "some stuff" on them. A visit to urgent care led to a negative test for strep throat, but the doctor ordered a biopsy. The result: Moore had squamous cell carcinoma—cancer—on her left tonsil.

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Moore's doctors say that if the chip hadn't jabbed her throat, she probably wouldn't have realized she had cancer for at least another year, at which point treatment would have been considerably more painful and difficult. As a result of her diagnosis—and the chip, really—Moore has also quit smoking. She's still eating Ruffles, though, on account of how Frito-Lay sent her coupons for two free bags. Two!