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I will say this upfront: I hate Black Friday. I will never understand why anyone would wake up at 4 a.m. the morning after Thanksgiving only to wait in the cold for three hours and then risk being trampled by a mob of crazed shoppers over something as silly as a discounted TV.

But sometimes, I suppose, people are motivated to join in on the madness because they want to make sure the perfect presents are under the tree for their kids on Christmas morning. That's kind of sweet, right? Here are 10 toys that have caused parents to lose their minds on Black Friday over the years:

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1. Pet Rock (1975)

What started as a joke quickly became a phenomenon. Gary Dahl, an advertising executive from California created the Pet Rock to be funny, and ended up a multimillionaire. It's literally just a rock in a box. Each rock came in a cardboard box, along with a 32-page training manual. Five million Pet Rocks were sold during a six month period, with sales peaking around Christmastime in 1976. The fad quickly died out soon after that—but not the pet rocks. Because they were rocks.

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2. Cabbage Patch Kids (1983)

Deemed by many as the "Original Black Friday," the day after Thanksgiving 1983 saw hoards of crazed parents trampling each other for a shot at grabbing a Cabbage Patch Kid. At a store in Pennsylvania, one woman was knocked to the ground and suffered a broken leg while a store manager literally held a baseball bat in the air to keep crazed shoppers at bay (You can watch the news report about it here). Cabbage Patch Dolls dolls sold out of stores in a heartbeat, but many were available on the "black market" for up to 1- times their retail price. So, if you ever find yourself looking for something to blame for turning the day after Thanksgiving from quiet time spent with family into a frenzy of consumerist madness, go yell at a Cabbage Patch doll. This is their fault.

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3. Teddy Ruxpin (1985)

Teddy Ruxpin, albeit slightly creepy, was extremely popular during the Christmas season of 1985. Eight-hundred-thousand of the talking bears were sold in 1985, many for two to three times their normal price because of a shortage around the holidays. Judging by this retro commercial, it appears that Teddy Ruxpin rose to popularity by brainwashing children to love him through his hypnotic stare and pre-recorded tapes.

4. Nintendo (1988)

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The OG Nintendo gaming system caused quite the stir over the holidays in 1988. Seven million NES systems were sold in 1988, making it the best-selling toy of that Christmas season and the entire year. One out of every six dollars families spent on toys was on video game systems and software. Later, Nintendo would follow this stellar performance up with Black Friday frenzies for the GameBoy, the Nintendo64, and the Nintendo Wii.

5. Tickle Me Elmo (1996)

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Not since the Cabbage Patch Kid had we seen a toy hysteria so insane, until 1996 when Tickle Me Elmo came on the scene. Thanks in part to an appearance on the Rosie O'Donnell Show, Tickle Me Elmo became the most popular toy for the holidays of '96, and you know what that means: Trampled store clerks! Fist fights at Walmart! Muppet black markets! Fancy jewelry stores on 5th Avenue offering a free Elmo with your purchase of expensive diamonds! You know, all the things Elmo truly stands for.

6. Furby (1998)

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I'm sure I wasn't the only 8-year-old to wake up on Christmas morning of 1998 excited to find a Furby under the tree, only to wonder two hours later why I had ever wanted this weird thing in the first place. During the three years of its original production, 40 million Furbys were sold. They were great when they were just babbling in their own little language, until they creepily began learning how to speak English and were banned at the Pentagon as a possible security risk. (Yes, that actually happened.)

9. Zhu Zhu Pets (2009)

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Zhu Zhu Pets (which are essentially hamsters minus the smells and poo) were all the rage in 2009. Though not quite as crazy as the Cabbage Patch or Tickle Me Elmo frenzies, Cepia, which manufactures Zhu Zhu Pets, said they made a whopping $70 million from sales in 2009 on a toy that costs less that $10 a pop.

10. Frozen merchandise (2014)

Ah, yes. Who could forget the Frozen fever of 2014? And with a huge demand for movie merchandise, of course the months leading up to Christmas of that year saw some crazy parents. Reports of physical fights breaking out in Disney Stores were not unheard of.

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And so, with that, I hope that you enjoy your turkey and your subsequent consumerist feeding frenzy this week. Happy holidays!