5 pranks that show why April Fool's and college admissions season should not mix.

5 pranks that show why April Fool's and college admissions season should not mix.
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High school is always fraught with anxiety, but especially towards the end of senior year. Spring is when most college admissions decisions are mailed out, sealing the fates of precocious teenagers and verifying whether or not a friendless four years of high school was worth it. But because the calendar is mean, decision season coincides with April Fool's Day, and young pranksters don't miss the opportunity to celebrate both things at once. Here are examples of college admissions-related pranks people played on their "friends" and other admissions jokes that fooled the Internet.

1. The teenage dirtbag who created a fake rejection letter for his "promposal."

5 pranks that show why April Fool's and college admissions season should not mix.
USC you at prom?

In a move that is some next-level negging, a dude named Dylan created a convincing fake letter from the University of South Carolina telling his girlfriend that her acceptance has been rescinded. Romantic, eh? The letter includes this charming paragraph: 

It saddens us to say that you [sic] admissions is in jeopardy, and we may have to pull our admissions from you due to your poor ethic and attendance. However if you were to just agree to go to prom with your boyfriend we would consider letting you continue to be a South Carolina Gamecock.

It's not quite romantic to turn that heart attack of a prank into a *heart* attack.

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2. The bros who did the hilarious twofer: college rejection and army induction.

Hilarious "friends" wanted to make sure a dude thought his dreams were destroyed from all different angles. First, they invented a non-existent draft, complete with letters from the Armed Forces and President of the United States, stating that the prankee would be required to join the military. They then created a rejection letter from Northern Kentucky University as a cherry on top. His reaction is heartbreaking. Ha ha?!

3.  The teen who fooled the Internet with her Harvard rejection swag.

5 pranks that show why April Fool's and college admissions season should not mix.
Turns out it wasn't veritas.
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While a senior in high school, Molly McGaan wrote a satirical Harvard rejection letter for her school's humor magazine, Citizen Poke, and it went crazy viral for its dankness:

...we are unable to offer admission to every student, regardless of their proficiency in "dank memes," or their level of "$wagg moneyyyy." Although your GPA and ACT scores were certainly up to our standards, your essays raised some eyebrows at the admissions meetings. For future reference, it is not wise to start an essay with the words, "listen here u little slanks" and end with "McGaan out *drops mic*"...

We also suggest obtaining recommendation letters from teachers or trusted mentors, not "my #4 side ho Derek" or Chief Keef, who submitted a picture of a dinosaur drawn in crayon on a rolling paper.

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The Internet loved the idea that the tweed-covered Harvard admissions officers would encounter an application that includes a "fire" mixtape and would take the time to quote it. Sadly, the letter was fake, but the writer's rejection from Harvard was real.

4. The siblings who forged a letter from their sister's dream school.

What's worse? Thinking you got a rejection letter from a college you were actually accepted to, or thinking you got accepted to a college when the verdict isn't out yet? These siblings thought it would be fun to print a letter from Northeastern University—but their sister caught on when she was dubious about the size of the envelope. While it would be exponentially meaner if it was confirmed that she didn't get in, the prank is still pretty bad. 

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5. The shitty friend whose prank went so deep he turned to Yahoo Answers.

5 pranks that show why April Fool's and college admissions season should not mix.
A friendly reminder that pranks are often forgery and fraud.

This dude went full-on fraud with his "prank," creating a fake email account using the real name of the dean. While the dude claims be a friend, he did lovingly say that the guy "had little chances of being accepted," and the whole community was fooled before he sent the retraction. The people on Yahoo Answers told the prankster to come clean immediately. This was six years ago, and the thread ends with a cliffhanger. It's unknown whether this guy is in jail or whether he learned to use proper punctuation.

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