Woman doesn't know what to do when coworker demands everyone refer to her boyfriend as her 'master.'

Woman doesn't know what to do when coworker demands everyone refer to her boyfriend as her 'master.'
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You don't have to like your coworkers, but you do have to tolerate them. However, consider yourself lucky that you don't have to tolerate one woman's coworker, who insisted that everyone in the office refer to her boyfriend as her "master." Really.

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The strange story was submitted by an anonymous woman to the "Ask a Boss" advice column in New York Magazine.

The weirdness started when "Sally" brought her boyfriend "Peter" to an office Christmas party in 2015 (names have been changed).

Everything there seemed fine as well, although at one point Peter asked Sally to get him a drink, to which she replied “Yes, master!” in a very I Dream of Jeannie kind of way. We all laughed it off as a joke, and it didn’t come up again.


But it did come up again. This time it was at a company BBQ several months later.

At this party, there was a good deal more of Peter ordering Sally around and Sally calling him “master”: He sent her to fetch drinks and hot dogs, he told her to find a place for them to sit, etc., to which she replied consistently with “Yes, master.” It made a number of people, myself included, clearly uncomfortable, but there was nothing objectively abusive about it (he never yelled at her or threatened her), and her immediate supervisor and her supervisor’s supervisor weren’t there, and so no one said anything (perhaps incorrectly?).

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Eventually Sally clarified that she is in a "24/7 dominant/submissive relationship" with Peter, and that he is not her boyfriend, but her "master." She then requested that instead of referring to Peter as her partner, everyone refer to to him as her master.

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wut?
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Sally even likened having people call Peter her master to gay rights and trans rights, saying that if she were a man, they wouldn’t erase her relationship by referring to “Peter” as “Patricia,” and so they shouldn’t erase their dominant/submissive relationship by calling him a partner instead of a master.

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You're reaching, Sally.
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In short, Sally would like people to say things like, "So how was your master's birthday party yesterday?" and "Are you going to bring your master to the company happy hour tonight?"

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Clearly this makes everyone incredibly uncomfortable, and the writer and her coworkers asked Alison Green, the person doles out the advice for New York Magazine's 'Ask a Boss' advice column, if they should comply with Sally's demands. You can read her entire response here.

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