Here's an interactive map of how hard it is for a family to rent a two-bedroom apartment in America.

Here's an interactive map of how hard it is for a family to rent a two-bedroom apartment in America.
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Each year, The National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) releases a map that shows the hourly wage an employee has to make to afford a two-bedroom rental in each state. The numbers are depressing, and now the map-making gurus at Spatial Cartography have an even more detailed illustration to show that Americans can't afford housing.

Here's what parts of America, based on census data on household income, are unable to afford a two-bedroom apartment.

The redder the state, the higher the percentage of people who can't afford a unit. Green means lowest percentage, and yellow represents the middle.

If you're curious, here's the original NLIHC data that Spacial Cartography is using. The number in each state represents the hourly wage needed to afford a two-bedroom.

(Get a closer look here.)

And here's the percentage of households in each state that can't afford it.​

Spatial Cartography concludes that the NLIHC is a good "starting point" to learn about affordable housing, but "the wage you see listed for your state [in the original NLIHC map] is probably not the wage you need to earn in your specific location" to afford a place. They define being able to "afford" a unit as paying less than 30 percent of your annual income for it per year.

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An even closer look, by county.

As you'll see from clicking around the above map, each state has certain counties that suffer more than others. And if you don't feel like clicking around, you can take it from Spacial Cartography, which concludes "it's obvious spatial variations [within states] do exist."

Go ahead, find your county and verify just how screwed you all are.

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