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Are you the kind of guy who would rather Netflix and chill than walk up a hill? Does your definition of crunching relate to the sound you making when biting into a delicious chip of choice instead of the ab exercise? When you say the word "sneakers" is that actually just you pronouncing the candy bar "Snickers" in a bizarre accent? Should I stop with these annoying rhetorical questions and get to the freaking point? What about one more? Great. Then this blog is for you, my friend. A new study which was published in March's Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise has found a new connection between male libido and amount of time dedicated to exercise, and let's just say you can keep up that chillin' and grillin' lifestyle if you enjoy frequent trips to Bone Town, USA—if you know what I mean.

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The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, took a new approach to studying the relationship between sex drive and exercise, The New York Times reports. In the past, researchers have looked at hormone levels, particularly testosterone, as the sole indicator of an increase in sex drive, but in this study, anecdotal information was gathered from more than 1,000 participants on their exercise and sex habits.

Men were asked to describe their exercise habits, giving information on the rigor of their workouts as well as the duration, and were also asked to answer questions about their sex lives and libido. Then, the researchers compared their answers. Here's what they found: "The men whose exercise routines were moderate or light in intensity or duration were far more likely to report moderate or high libidos than were the men whose workouts were especially prolonged or intense, even after the researchers controlled for age," The New York Times reports.

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Anthony Hackney, a professor of exercise physiology and nutrition at the University of North Carolina who led the study, also noted that participants who claimed to practice moderate and light physical activity were associated in this study with relatively high libidos. And when it came to those who said they participated in strenuous activity, it “was associated with lower libido." The study couldn't really conclude whether or not exercise causes lower libido, just that the two were linked. But if you ask me, I think God is punishing people who have finally achieved perfect bodies with the curse of not wanting to get naked.

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Sources: The New York Times | Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise