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Why is the female orgasm so dang elusive? Well, a new study reveals that it might only be elusive to heterosexual men trying to create them.

The study, published in the journal of Archives of Sexual Behavior, was based on responses of more than 52,000 people between the ages of 18 and 65, who were in a relationship with one person. And according to The Guardian, the results showed an "orgasm" gap when it came to different gender pairings:

While 95% of heterosexual men reported that they usually or always orgasmed during sexually intimate moments, just 65% of heterosexual women did. By contrast, the figure was 89% for gay men, 86% for lesbian women, 88% for bisexual men and 66% for bisexual women.

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In short: hetero dudes, what gives? It's easy to blame either party for the fact that straight women orgasm the least. Some will say that men have not done their research and put in their due diligence to understand what works for women. Others might say that the "recipe" for a female orgasm is more complicated than that of a man's, and that women need to communicate clearly what works for them (and shouldn't fake orgasms, because that doesn't help anyone out). But thankfully this study has also concluded the "golden trio" of things that are sure to make a woman orgasm: "a combination of genital stimulation, deep kissing and oral sex." THIS SEEMS VERY OBVIOUS??

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The study also concluded that 30% of straight men still believe that vaginal sex is the best way to bring a woman to climax. But the statistics show that is absolutely not the case:

According to the research, only 35% of heterosexual women always or usually orgasm during vaginal sex alone, with 44% saying they rarely or never did. By contrast, 80% of heterosexual women and 91% of lesbians always or usually orgasm with a combination of genital stimulation, deep kissing and oral sex – but without vaginal sex.

The upside is that 70% of men seem to know that what they learned from porn is inacurrate, but it's a little crazy that almost one-third of the male population is still living under that assumption. The conclusions seem to all point towards the fact that heterosexual partners need to have better communication when it comes to what gets them to climax, but the co-author of the study, Elisabeth Lloyd, put that onus entirely on women. "I would like [women] to take that home and think about it, and to think about it with their partners and talk about it with their partners," she said of the results. Come on, Elisabeth, why does this have to be the woman's job? Sigh.

Sources: The Guardian