China's English-language media falls for 30-year-old April Fool's Day prank.

China's English-language media falls for 30-year-old April Fool's Day prank.
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For the past 30 years, Joey Skaggs has put out a press release for a non-existent April Fool's Day Parade in New York... but don't tell the Chinese.

The above video is in English and aimed at Americans, but make no mistake, it's Chinese. Specifically, it's from the SinoVision English Channel, which is exactly as state-sponsored as it sounds: very. Unfortunately for the American reporter they've hired, Christie Clements, Chinese media's bullshit detectors have atrophied from decades of Orwellian propaganda at home, so they sent her out to cover New York's famed April Fool's Day Parade...which does not exist. Here's a sample from the press release that fooled SinoVision:

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The April Fool's Day Parade has been a running joke since 1986, propagated by eternal prankster Joey Skaggs, who has duped CNN into running a story about replacing juries with ominously-named "Solomon Project" computers, told Good Morning America about his "Fat Squad" of angry Marines who would physically force you to diet, and appeared in Ms. magazine as the CEO of a celebrity sperm bank. Oh, and he got a lot of people to show up in Mahhattan to see "Bigfoot":

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Wait, what's the prank? I have now successfully seen Bigfoot. (via Joe Skaggs)

In (a very tiny) defense of SinoVision, the idea of the fake April Fool's Day Parade is actually a pretty good one: people make floats and costumes satirizing "fools" from the past year of politics, news, and culture. It also explains why Chinese TV would be so happy to feature it, since it (if it existed) makes fun of the US power elite. Ironically, the Chinese probably wouldn't emphasize the "Hands Up, Don't Shoot!" theme of this year's (non-existent) parade, since they usually want to portray police crackdowns like in Ferguson as the normal behavior of world powers.

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See also: The most entertaining instance in history of China's state newspaper believing a story in The Onion.

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