Fat-shaming teacher gives out handy "How Not to Look Fat" pamphlet.

Fat-shaming teacher gives out handy "How Not to Look Fat" pamphlet.
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What happens to teenage angst when you mix it with fat-shaming homework? Let's find out.

Fat-shaming teacher gives out handy "How Not to Look Fat" pamphlet.

(News 12 via HelloGiggles)

A Long Island high school teacher gave students in a fashion design class a series of course materials entitled "How Not to Look Fat." The reference pages include important high school curriculum points like:

"Busty? Good. Booty? Good. Back fat? Eh, not so good."

"Rule to live by: The softer the flesh, the chunkier the fabric should be—knits, wovens, any fabric."

"...ever see a really chubby person in some super-thin T-shirt fabric? Yeah, it's not pretty. Don't be that person."

Great job letting children know that certain parts of their bodies are officially good or bad, that "chubby" people are not allowed to wear particular types of clothes, should hide their bodies, and that they all should try their hardest to accomplish the goal of not being a fat person. If they already happen to be a fat person? Well, high school just got even more dehumanizing. One of the images even shows a crying girl who has back rolls with three arrows deeming her "SAD!" Probably true if she was in that class.

Fat-shaming teacher gives out handy "How Not to Look Fat" pamphlet.

(News 12 via HelloGiggles)

The full text reads:

BACK FAT

In the wide world of adipose tissue, there are some deposits that simply are more favorable than others.
Busty? Good.
Booty? Good.
Back fat? Eh, not so good.
Sad fact: A lumpy back is almost as unavoidable as cellulite.
Unless you're model thin, you're probably afflicted with back rolls—you know, those unattractive bulges that make you look like a stuffed sausage in what was meant to be a tight, sexy shirt.
Sure, you could go running five times a week and wedge yourself into a Nautilus contraption to press-up, pull-down, crunch, and tighten your muscles. But that's the hard way.
Here are five quick-and-easy, tried-and-true ways to reduce the appearance of mini-rolls.
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Fat-shaming teacher gives out handy "How Not to Look Fat" pamphlet.

(News 12 via HelloGiggles)

Full text:

Rule to live by: The softer the flesh, the chunkier the fabric should be—knits, wovens, any fabric.
Not only will a heavier fabric have less of a chance of actually being caught between folds of flesh, but the way a fabric like six-ply cashmere—substantial, but still thick—softly, gracefully glides over womanly curves is absolutely, undeniably a beautiful thing.
And besides, ever see a really chubby person in some super-thin T-shirt fabric?
Yeah, it's not pretty.
Don't be that person.

Dictionary of Necklines
Strapless tops (like bandeaus and tubes) are good for most women who don't need the support of bra straps. Not needing a bra means this: no sagging—from a side view, your nipple should sit approximately halfway between your shoulder and your elbow. A potential pitfall: If you have a bad case of back fat or bad posture, a tube top is not for you.
V-necks are the safest bet and are flattering on the vast majority of women.
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Fat-shaming teacher gives out handy "How Not to Look Fat" pamphlet.

(News 12 via HelloGiggles)

One student said the teacher told them the materials also showed how she and her classmates should dress. Katelynn Passarella, a really cool high school student who thinks for herself and is my new role model, told the teacher she was offended, but nothing happened. Now the superintendent of the school district has called the materials inappropriate (duh), and says they won't be taught in the future.

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On the bright side, it's cool that this high school offers fashion design.

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