Someecards Logo
ADVERTISING
Groom asks if he was wrong to kick brother out of party for calling fiancée 'gold digger.'

Groom asks if he was wrong to kick brother out of party for calling fiancée 'gold digger.'

ADVERTISING

While weddings can be beautiful flower-adorned celebrations of love and champagne, they can sometimes bring out a trail of underlying family drama.

Even when the couple getting married thinks everything is casual, beneath the surface a wedding can inspire reality television-worthy tension. Mother-in-laws showing up in floor-length white lace gowns, bridesmaids arguing in the group chat about the cost of the destination bachelorette party, the tipsy aunt making one too many comments about the bride's "revealing" dress at the rehearsal dinner--sometimes it's easier to just elope in the desert with your dog and a cactus as the witnesses.

Even when the officiant asks if anyone objects, keeping any thoughts you have about the bride's motivation to marry a wealthy man thirty years older than her to yourself is the standard wedding etiquette. If the couple isn't meant to be, they'll discover that without your rehearsed rant in the back of the reception.

So, when a frustrated groom decided to consult the online courtroom of moral philosophy about whether or not he was wrong to "cause a scene" at his own engagement party, people were quick to help deem a verdict.

© Copyright 2023 Someecards, Inc

ADVERTISING
Featured Content