Lili Reinhart perfectly responds to claims she's 'not curvy enough' to be insecure.

Lili Reinhart perfectly responds to claims she's 'not curvy enough' to be insecure.
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Since gaining a huge public platform, the Riverdale actress Lili Reinhart has been very outspoken about her personal struggles with depression and body dysmorphia.

While many have lauded the actress for bringing light to such widespread important issues, other have some pretty big critiques for the actress. Particularly, when it comes to her expressing insecurities about her body.

Several people have claimed that Reinhart is too thin and conventionally attractive to suffer from body dysmorphia, but a specific series of now deleted tweets inspired her latest response.

The tweets came in direct response to Reinhart's recent appearance in Harper's Bazaar, where she talked candidly about how body standards have affected her self esteem.

Lili Reinhart perfectly responds to claims she's 'not curvy enough' to be insecure.
Twitter
Lili Reinhart perfectly responds to claims she's 'not curvy enough' to be insecure.
Twitter
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If we're going to dive in, the commenter had a point, Hollywood DOES prioritize airing the needs of women who are conventionally attractive. It's hard to feel like the conversation about body positivity is radical when it's consistently helmed by women who fit into straight-sizes and simultaneously define the beauty standards.

However, Reinhart's thinness and conventional attractive still isn't an excuse to deny her mental health and body image issues. Particularly, since body dysmorphia is defined by the inability to perceive your body the way it looks to others.

Reinhart was quick to dive in and point out that her body size doesn't dictate the way she's affected by our culture's obsession with thinness.

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She also brought up the fact that denying someone else's mental health issues only makes them worse.

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She went on to say that you're not required to understand someone else's insecurity, but that shouldn't stop you from respecting it.

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One woman had a great response that both respected Reinhart's struggle while better explaining the frustrations larger women are feeling.

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If I could give this thread a big hug, I would. It's really important for us (as a culture) have nuanced and open discussions about body dysmorphia, and all of the factors that can enforce. Shaming Reinhart for being "too thin" to feel insecure doesn't help the problem at all. Similarly, our culture's habit of primarily highlighting thin women's concerns, even in the context of body positive movements, is yet another symptom of the problem.

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