The 8 best quotes from current and former employees about what kind of boss Trump is.

The 8 best quotes from current and former employees about what kind of boss Trump is.
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It's National Boss's Day, a day to suck up to your boss even more than usual. The holiday is being celebrated in the White House with a cabinet meeting, as America's Top Boss talks Donald Trump exercises his authority for the cameras. Not only is Trump a boss, he played one on TV, and people (and celebrities!) even competed to get to work for him. But what kind of boss is he? Here's some insight into what kind of leader our Dear Leader is.

1. He knows everything there is to know about Caesar salad.

You, Bernard Goupy, have been the head chef for six months at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, where you serve a Caesar salad in a fancy bowl made from Parmesan cheese. Then one day, Trump stalks into the kitchen yelling about how one of his guests didn’t like the salad. And he angrily demonstrates the proper way to do it, throwing lettuce and tomatoes in a regular bowl and screaming that this is “how we make a Caesar salad where I come from.”

On TV, it’s hard to talk back to Trump. But in the kitchen at Mar-a-Lago, Goupy can’t resist. “I didn’t know you were the new executive chef,” Goupy tells the boss.

Trump, furious, storms off.

It’s only the next day that Goupy is actually fired—and not by Trump, but by the club’s general manager, who delivers the message that Trump doesn’t want to see Goupy around anymore.

-Politico, The Executive Mr. Trump, July/August 2016

2. He's not afraid to humiliate you.

When deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein appointed Robert Mueller as special counsel for the Russia investigation, Attorney General Jeff Sessions had the misfortune of being in the room when Trump got the news:

When the phone call ended, Mr. McGahn relayed the news to the president and his aides. Almost immediately, Mr. Trump lobbed a volley of insults at Mr. Sessions, telling the attorney general it was his fault they were in the current situation. Mr. Trump told Mr. Sessions that choosing him to be attorney general was one of the worst decisions he had made, called him an “idiot,” and said that he should resign.

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-The New York Times, "Trump Humiliated Jeff Sessions After Mueller Appointment,"

The proof is in the tweets.

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3. His voice is his intercom.

He didn’t dial office-to-office extensions. He didn’t use an intercom. He just yelled, for what he wanted and from whom.

-Politico, The Executive Mr. Trump, July/August 2016

4. He made sure only the prettiest secretaries served coffee.

Is he a sexist? By the late 1980s, Trump had taken to decorating his office with beautiful women. The receptionists and his assistants looked like models. When he had a meeting, only the most beautiful secretaries were allowed to greet the guests or serve coffee. Does that make him a sexist? He certainly hired not-so-attractive females, he just hid them when people were around. Trump was, again, only giving the people what they want. Being gorgeous was just a BFOQ (bona fide occupational qualification) for working the front office.

To be fair, Trump thought everyone should be attractive, not just women. He was very critical of ugly people, especially fat people, but he never discriminated in hiring them, as far as I can tell. We had plenty of heavy people working for us. However, as I predicted, the overweight contestant on the first "Apprentice" show was the first to go.

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-Barbara A. Res in The New York Daily News, February 9th, 2016

5. He demands praise. In public.

Just watch this super supercut.

6. He's a little teapot.

One Trump confidant likened the president to a whistling teapot, saying that when he does not blow off steam, he can turn into a pressure cooker and explode. “I think we are in pressure cooker territory,” said this person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to talk candidly.

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-The Washington Post, "A ‘pressure cooker’: Trump’s frustration and fury rupture alliances, threaten agenda," October 9th, 2016

7. He needs to be intensely managed.

During the campaign, when President Trump’s advisers wanted him to stop talking about a certain issue — such as when he attacked a Gold Star military family — they sometimes presented him with polls demonstrating how the controversy was harming his candidacy.

During the transition, when aides needed Trump to decide on a looming issue or appointment, they often limited him to a shortlist of two or three options and urged him to choose one.

And now in the White House, when advisers hope to prevent Trump from making what they think is an unwise decision, they frequently try to delay his final verdict — hoping he may reconsider after having time to calm down.

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-The Washington Post, "Inside the ‘adult day-care center’: How aides try to control and coerce Trump," October 16th, 2017

8. He'll be won over if you just slam the media.

[Defense Secretary] Mattis has also worked to get on Trump’s good side by criticizing the media for putting too much emphasis on his disagreements with Trump. “I do my best to call it like I see it,” he told reporters in late August. “But, right now, if I say six and the president says half a dozen, they are going to say I disagree with him. You know? So, let’s just get over that.”

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-The Washington Post, "Inside the ‘adult day-care center’: How aides try to control and coerce Trump," October 16th, 2017

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