Donald Trump might sue the 'New York Times.' Experts say that's a bad idea.

Donald Trump might sue the 'New York Times.' Experts say that's a bad idea.
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Reporters from CNN and the Washington Post say the Trump campaign is drafting a lawsuit against the New York Times for publishing two women's accounts of sexual assault at the hands of Donald Trump, according to the Huffington Post.

The same goes for the Palm Beach Post, which published yet another story from a woman, named Mindy McGillivray, who says Trump groped her 13-years-ago.

As of yet, the Trump campaign has not threatened to sue People Magazine for publishing their own writer's first person account of a her sexual assault by Donald Trump, although he has categorically denied it.

He has also completely denied allegations laid out against him in the other articles. One of the writers responsible for the New York Times piece shared Trump's response when she spoke to him Tuesday night.

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Regarding the Times story, the Huffington Post obtained a quote from the paper's spokesperson, who told them, "We stand by the story, which falls clearly into the realm of public service journalism."

Meanwhile, a Trump lawyer, Marc E. Kasowitz, sent an "open letter" to Times executive editor Dean Baquet:

Your article is reckless, defamatory and constitutes libel per se. We hereby demand that you immediately cease any further publication of this article, remove it from your website and issue a full and immediate retraction and apology. Failure to do so will leave my client with no option but to purse all available actions and remedies.

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According to CNNMoney, a lawsuit could actually benefit the papers more than Trump, because "it will give both the Times and the Post the opportunity to pursue discovery and request information on Trump's entire sexual history, because Trump would have the burden of proving falsity and actual malice."

As the Washington Post elaborates further, a lawsuit against journalists or their institutions would be "risky."

"It would be very appropriate and relevant for the reporters to question Trump on the truth of the allegation under oath, and a court would likely order depositions," a media law expert named John L. Diamond told the Post. "There is no Fifth Amendment protection for civil cases."

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This means, roughly, that the whole truth would come out in a court of law. Even if he could prove that the victim's statements were false, he'd have to prove "that a statement was made with knowledge that it was false or with reckless disregard of whether or not it was false."

Trump has also threatened to sue the New York Times over the release of his partial tax return earlier in October.

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