Here's how Obama's female staffers made sure their voices were heard.

Here's how Obama's female staffers made sure their voices were heard.
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When Obama first entered office (you remember, back before hope was dead), nearly all of his top staffers were men who had worked on his campaign: Rahm Emanuel, David Axelrod, Lawrence Summers, and others (Valerie Jarrett is a notable exception).

The women in the White House, including Susan Rice and Anita Dunn, quickly realized that they weren't always being included in important meetings and worried their voices weren't being heard. Instead of just leaning in harder, they started doing something called "amplification," an anonymous aide told the Washington Post.

Here's how the Post describes "amplification":

When a woman made a key point, other women would repeat it, giving credit to its author. This forced the men in the room to recognize the contribution — and denied them the chance to claim the idea as their own.

It worked.

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Obama noticed the trend and started calling on female aides for their opinions more often. Now, at the end of his administration, there are more women in powerful positions in the White House than in 2009—nearly an even split with men.

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It's a testament to how powerful women can be if we work together instead of competing, which frankly, Beyoncé has been trying to tell us for years.

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