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On MSNBC on Sunday, host Ari Melber offered some resistance catnip with a segment called, "Did Trump libel Obama?" The segment focused on Donald Trump's unbelievable tweets on Saturday, when the current commander-in-chief accused Barack Obama of wire-tapping his phone lines during the campaign.

But it's not just MSNBC who made the suggestion of libel, it's everyone who's been trying to find an opening in Teflon Don's apparently invincible armor.

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According to Melber, Trump may have accidentally exposed himself to a strong legal case. To win a libel suit—especially difficult against a public figure—the plaintiff must prove that the statement was false, and that "the person [knew] it was false or was... reckless about whether it was false," according to NBC News.

The New York Times reports that FBI director James Comey denies Trump's wiretapping claims, which might prove the first point. And if Melber's reports are true, that Trump sent the tweets without trying to verify the claims with his staff first, then that's, to say the least, a bit reckless. According to Melber:

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Today the White House says that a congressional investigation is needed to resolve this. So that means on Saturday, Trump makes these charges, and by Sunday his staff says they need an inquiry to see whether if what he said was true. Believe me, that's not good.

But now let's turn to another part of the internet, the humble question-and-answer website Quora, where more anonymous resistors are having the same discussion. There, commenters are weighing the logic of Barack Obama even getting into a legal battle with Donald Trump, who's clearly well versed in the art of the lawsuit.

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Writes one commenter, "He might even win the court battle. But he would have slightly reduced his reputation by even playing in the same sandpit with Donald."

But let's say Obama did sue, and he did do battle with Trump in court. According to NBC News, the president has "immunity from civil damages and liability while conducting presidential acts."

So the question might be—are tweets presidential acts?