First-day-of-class icebreaker leads to huge plot twist for two writing students.

First-day-of-class icebreaker leads to huge plot twist for two writing students.
Advertising

Two Columbia MFA students discover they are long-lost sisters during an ice-breaker conversation in class.

//cdn.someecards.com/posts/sisters-T217.jpg

Lizzie Valverde (left) and Katy Olson (right) became sisters without rushing Delta Delta Delta. (via Fox8.com)

Lizzie Valverde and Katy Olson started at Columbia as two students from different parts of the country simply seeking masters degrees, but ended up reuniting as family.

On the first day of a new class Valverde and Olson were both enrolled in, the class was asked to introduce themselves. Usually, these icebreaker conversations merely help kill a half hour on the first day of classes. Valverde introduced herself briefly, telling the class she was adopted as a child and is now a mother to a daughter of her own. She also weirdly mentions her Olson Twins fanaticism.

The details sounded so familiar to Olsen, who knew a few details about her biological family and her adoption. The details of Valverde's story matched up with the information Olsen had on her biological mother and possible older sister. The New York Times accounts how, after class, Olsen stopped Valverde to confirm her suspicions.

So she approached Ms. Valverde after class and began blurting out such detailed questions about her personal life — about her maiden name, if she had been adopted in Florida and whether she lived in New Jersey — that Ms. Valverde, who never knew she had a biological sister, was stunned.
“I think we're sisters," Ms. Olson recalled saying.
All Ms. Valverde could do was utter, “Is this real life?"
Advertising

In a strange twist of fate, these two separated sisters ended up not only in the same city, in not only the same city, not only the same university, but the same class! Thanks to this twist of fate, Olson was now able to finally get in touch with her biological mother. Before they met, Valverde had done her own searching and found their mother living in Florida.

The New York Times also spoke to the mother of the newly-acquainted sisters, Leslie Parker, who gave up her daughters due to many hardships, including being attacked by serial killer Gary Ray Bowles. Parker is extremely proud of her two daughters, especially for following the same dream she once had of being a writer.

Advertising