A group of California girls is fighting to join the Boy Scouts. They call themselves the Unicorns.

A group of California girls is fighting to join the Boy Scouts. They call themselves the Unicorns.
Advertising

A group of girls is trying to enter one of California's oldest boys clubs: no, not the club of high-paid Hollywood directors—the Boy Scouts. The group of five girls, who call themselves the Unicorns, are former Girl Scouts who want a more hands-on outdoors experience—the sort of experience the Boy Scouts offer. And the Unicorns are good at that hands-on outdoors stuff, too. In the spring, they participated against several Boy Scout troops in an event called Camporee where they're "judged for grit and spirit," and they placed second. 

Boy Scout leaders, however, are not interested in letting the girls join, either on the local or national level. Local leaders rebuffed the girls, and the national organization sent this to journalists: "We understand that the values and the lessons of scouting are attractive to the entire family. However, Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts are year-round programs for boys and young men.” Title IX is no help in this case, either—it actually has an exception for the Boy Scouts, noting that they don't have to allow women to enter.

The arguments people are giving against letting the Unicorns join the Boy Scouts are things like "Yeah, this is supposed to be a place where boys can run around and get their sillies out" and "Coed tents? No THANK you!" as if agreeing to let girls join the Boy Scouts would automatically mean that they had to share tents. Neither of those are concerns of the Unicorns, who just care about getting to do the same work the Boy Scouts do:

Advertising
Advertising