Advertising

Fyre Fest has already come (and bombed) and gone, but the fall-out just keeps on coming. According to audio from last Friday obtained by Vice News, the founder of the fest, 25-year-old Billy McFarland, is not going to be paying the twelve or so employees who worked for him the prior two weeks. They must be so happy!

He's not firing them, either, something that would possibly allow them to be eligible for unemployment benefits. But he is giving them the opportunity to stay on as unpaid employees of Fyre Media, in case they manage to get the company to the place where they might actually be paid. Great.

Advertising

In the audio, which you can listen to on Vice's site, McFarland can be heard saying,

After conferring with our counsel and all financial people, unfortunately we are not able to proceed with payroll immediately, for the company. I understand that is not an ideal situation for everybody and will likely cause a lot of you to resign, which we totally get and understand. That said, if you want to stick with us, we'd love to have you and we'd love to work together and hunker down and get to a place where everything resumes to business as usual. So while we can't fulfill any obligations in the near term future, we're committed to growing the booking platform and making the business we all know it can and hopefully eventually will become.

Advertising

One employee asked, "So you're not going to lay us off, which would allow us to file for unemployment benefits? You just are not going to pay us any more then, making us quit ourselves." According to Vice, most the Fyre Media employees quit. Surprise!

The Fyre Fest in April was a spectacular failure, with attendees spending up to $12,000 promised live music and luxury dwellings in the Bahamas, but showing up to find only port-a-potties and FEMA-type tents. Some people who tried to leave found themselves locked overnight in an airport without access to food or water. Festival by FYRE!

Advertising

Since then, Fyre Media has been hit with at least seven lawsuits, including two class-action lawsuits, one of which is seeking $100 million in damages. Sounds like they're not going to have any employees on the payroll anytime soon.