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A Swiss hotel is facing backlash after posting a sign requiring the Jewish guests to bathe before entering the pool, Newsweek reports. The Paradies Arosa hotel, located outside Zurich, also put a sign on a communal refrigerator restricting the hours that the Jewish guests could access their food. The acceptable hours were between 10 and 11am and between 4.30 and 5.30 pm, according to the Guardian. That sign read, "“I hope you understand that our team does not like to be disturbed every time.”

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The woman who manages the small hotel, Ruth Thomann, told The Jerusalem Post that the seemingly very anti-Semitic signs were put up because “the behavior of some of those guests is making other guests feel uncomfortable, and we received complaints so we need to be responsible for all our guests and find a balance.” Huh? She added that she has "nothing against Jews." No, of course not!

Speaking to the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Thomann said “I may have selected the wrong words. The signs should have been addressed to all the guests instead of Jewish ones." She added, however, that the Jewish guests were the only ones who didn’t shower before entering the pool.

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In a statement given on Monday, Israel's Deputy Foreign Minister Tzipi Hotovely characterized the signs as “an anti-Semitic act of the worst and ugliest kind.” “Unfortunately, anti-Semitism in Europe is still a reality, and we must make sure that the punishment for incidents such as these will serve as deterrents for those who still harbor the germ of anti-Semitism,” Hotovely continued. The Jerusalem Post reports that Hotovely wants Thomann to be prosecuted for a hate crime, and said the signs were representative of the antisemitism throughout Europe.

On Tuesday, The Simon Wiesenthal Centre, which "promotes human rights and confronts anti-Semitism," according to the Guardian, requested that the travel website Booking.com remove the Paradies from its directory. It also reportedly published a letter asking Switzerland to "close [the] hotel of hate and penalize its management."

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“Unfortunately, antisemitism in Europe is still a reality and we must make sure that the punishment for incidents such as these will serve as deterrents for those who still harbor the germ of antisemitism,” Hotovely said.