Jon Stewart breaks down Netanyahu's speech, reminds us why we need 'The Daily Show.'

Jon Stewart breaks down Netanyahu's speech, reminds us why we need 'The Daily Show.'
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Someone please explain everything to me slowly.

I did my best to sum up my layman's understanding of Netanyahu's speech, but the difficulty I had in doing that highlights the most important point in this article: no matter who replaces Jon Stewart, we really need The Daily Show. Sure, it's liberal, and sure, it's a comedian's point of view, but rarely do I walk away from a cable news analysis roundtable with 6 hosts with as much information as I do from this comedy program. Anyway, in this clip, Stewart spends the first few minutes discussing the run-up to the speech, why it was so controversial, the reaction of the Jewish community, and how this affects the US-Israeli relationship. You know, comedy news. Then, he analyzes the big points of the speech itself. You'll learn something, treat yourself.

Sort-of news analysis from a humor blogger:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu spoke to Congress yesterday afternoon and basically said that the US and other major powers (France, Russia, Britain, Germany and China) are "offering" Iran a sweetheart deal and that we're all being duped into letting Iran have nukes in 10 years. He is not without a case, but it's also not clear that he has an alternative. Also, since he claims Iran could have a nuke in weeks if it went all-out (not an outlandish claim—similar estimates say Japan could make one in less than a week if they ever felt like it), it's kind of unclear what options besides WWIII are on the table.

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Regarding his case's strong points: the new deal basically limits Iran's access to enrichable nuclear material but does not stop the civilian nuclear program from existing (which, though we may hate it, we don't exactly have a legal way to seize and halt). In the past, Russia has handled the removal of these materials. Also, if the deal goes well and Iran lets inspectors in to verify the removal of radioactive material and monitor of their programs, many sanctions would be lifted in 10 years. I can't say for certain, of course, because the deal hasn't been announced. It's still being negotiated.

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I wish I could have just had Jon Stewart sum that up.

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