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When the L.A. Lakers travel to Oklahoma City to play the Thunder, they stay in the Skirvin Hotel, a 1911 behemoth believed by many to be haunted—a belief shared by Lakers small forward Metta World Peace, who said he was taken advantage of by spirits during his stay. The Skirvin is widely believed to be haunted, thanks to gruesome legends about its founder. Visitors often report hearing a baby crying and/or seeing a ghost woman pushing a baby carriage. World Peace, however, encountered...friendlier ghosts.

The ghosts were all over me. I just accepted it. They touched me all over the place. I’m taking one of the ghosts to court for touching me in the wrong places.

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Despite threatening legal action against the deceased gropers, Metta World Peace did choose to finish his in-room movie. "I was watching a good movie," apparently Money Monster, "and I was tired. I didn’t want to move."

Other NBA players have reported supernatural incidents at the hotel like doors slamming or the aforementioned crying baby (which, y'know, might just be a crying baby in a hotel). In fact, Lakers guard Lou Williams and forward Larry Nance Jr. opted to pay for their own accommodations nearby, rather than mess with forces beyond human comprehension.

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The Skirvin was built in 1911 by a wildcatter (an independent oil speculator) named Bill Skirvin. He originally had a partner, Fred Scheruble, who died under mysterious circumstances. Despite suspicions from investigators, the case against one of Oklahoma City's most prominent citizens was dropped. Skirvin (like a certain other hotel magnate today) was known for hosting parties with "loose women" at the hotel. The haunting legend begins here. Apparently, Skirvin impregnated a maid named Effie. The stories vary, but according to legend she was either locked in a 10th floor room until she died or was driven to jump out of a window. In any case, the legend of Effie is the root of the Skirvin's haunted rumors. Until now, though, Effie had never been accused of taking liberties with any of the guests.

Sources: Matthew Rutledge