Skydiving instructor becomes "emergency highway landing instructor" after mechanical failure.

Skydiving instructor becomes "emergency highway landing instructor" after mechanical failure.
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Amazingly, except for a cut to the instructor's arm, no one (not even the cars) were hurt. The instructor did have to "sacrifice the plane" to avoid power lines, but he even pulled over to park.

A Cessna single-engine plane carrying an instructor and some students of the Skydive East Coast skydiving school* suffered a mechanical failure at 4,000 feet, forcing the instructor to make an emergency landing on New Jersey's Route 72. No one was injured, aside from a cut to the instructor's arm, and no cars were damaged, although the Cessna did knock down some traffic signs as it landed and parked on the grassy median of the highway.

Said George Voishnis, who owns the plane and co-owns Skydive East Coast, "We are very happy all are safe. The instructors readied their students, and the pilot expertly flew the plane, avoiding power lines and landing between the cars on Route 72." If he sounds happy, you can guess how pumped the students were. Actually, you can see it here:

As someone who grew up in New Jersey, I can tell you that one constant on our roads is that you should never be surprised by how fast the vehicle overtaking you on your left is going. That said, it's still somewhat surprising when it is landing from above and behind you and its wing goes right over the top of your car. But hey, as long as they're not slowing up the left lane.

*I guess they were learning to be the full-time divers who strap themselves on to tourists' backs? I've known a lot of people who went skydiving and I don't recall an extended learning period preceding it.

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