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The Metropolitan Opera had to cut short a performance of Rossini's Guillaume Tell on Saturday after an audience member sprinkled a "mysterious powder" in the opera pit at intermission, the New York Times reports. Counterterrorism officials were called to the scene and tested the powder. Turns out it's not explosive, but probably something almost as creepy: a dead man's ashes.

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Several audience members reported that an unidentified man told them that he went to the show with the intention of sprinkling the ashes of his late friend and opera mentor at the historic opera house, NYPD deputy commissioner John Miller told the Associated Press.

The man was reportedly observed on security cameras reaching into a black bag and sprinkling the contents into the orchestra pit at intermission, when most of the musicians weren't present (so thoughtful!). No one was injured, but the second half of the show was canceled “to err on the side of appropriate caution,” said a Met spokesman. They also canceled another show that evening.

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Miller told AP that the powder is still being tested, but the possibility that it's human ashes “is certainly an area that we are pursuing.” Which sounds like legal code for "it's definitely human ashes bro." Miller added: "I don't believe at this point that we see any criminal intent here." Police know who the individual is from security footage and are following up.

Some audience goers documented the whole weird incident on Twitter as it was happening.

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"Everybody kind of slowly walked out," an audience member named Dylan Hayden told the AP. "As we were exiting the building, I noticed the counterterrorism unit going into the building."

I don't support dumping human ashes or anything else for that matter at historic, indoor landmarks. But I do empathize with the guy who was just trying to sprinkle his buddy's ashes in a special place. He may not be the most considerate opera goer, but he seems like a very good friend.

Sources: New York Times