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Hey, remember last week when we wrote about that weird, creepy listing for a house for sale in Columbia, South Carolina? The one where no one was allowed to see the upstairs, where a mysterious tenant lived and would not be paying rent? And we speculated that a ghost or demon might be living upstairs in this obviously haunted house? Well, turns out that the ghost is alive! And according to the News & Observer, he's actually a 70-year-old artist named Randall McKissick. He's not even evil!

The News & Observer interviewed McKissick, the divorced father of two and grandfather of one, who was once a world-renowned artist but has since fallen on hard times. His work has been shown internationally in Paris, Johannesburg and St. Thomas, as well as an abundance of places within the U.S. But with the advent of computer graphics, McKissick found himself struggling. On top of that, he dealt with divorce, eviction, and an ongoing battle with anxiety.

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Randall McKissick has been friends with the owner of the house, Michael Schumpert Sr., since they were children. For about the last decade, his friend has allowed him to live rent-free in the upstairs apartment, with his three cats. But in December, Schumpert was in a car accident resulting in a broken back. (He apparently couldn't be reached for comment by the News & Observer). It was Schumpert's son, Michael Jr., who wrote the ad for the house. He told the News & Observer, “We don’t really have much choice but to sell the house; my parents need to sell it. But it’s been in the family for so long, we don’t really want to. And we want Randy to be able to stay there.”

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Michael Schumpert, Jr. has taken down the ad and the house is, for now, off the market. He's not sure what the next step will be.

McKissick’s daughter, Amber Albert, said their family is looking into other housing for McKissick, a place with room for a studio that will let him keep his cats. But money is an issue in their family, as well. And then there's Randall McKissick's anxiety, which apparently makes it difficult for him to travel or deal with changes.

But, he told the News & Observer, if he has to move, he will. He said, “I just want to paint again. I just want to find that spark.”