These Japanese statues made from dead bugs are gross but also kind of cool.

These Japanese statues made from dead bugs are gross but also kind of cool.
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The sculpture scene of 70s Japan was a crazy place.

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He's like Geppetto...sort of. (via Kotaku/Naver)

Yoneji Inamura is a 95-year-old living in the Gunma Prefecture of Japan. For reasons unbeknownst to you and I, he made some crazy sculptures made out of preserved bugs in the 70s. The first one he did depicts Nitta Yoshisada, the head of one Japan's most prominent 14th-century families. He made it in 1970 out of 5,000 preserved insects. It was put on display in his home, for a Children's Day celebration.

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"Mom, can we not go to Uncle Yoneji's house for Children's Day?" (via Kotaku/Naver)

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How to celebrate your childhood in the most terrifying way possible. (via Kotaku/Naver)

After being criticized for killing so many bugs, he then held a memorial for the bugs, made out of the bugs. The memorial took the form of a shrine to the Thousand-Armed Kannon, the Buddhist deity of mercy. Where was he getting all these bugs?

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He probably had a business arrangement with a local exterminator. (via Kotaku/Naver)

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Thousand-Armed Kannon: "Thanks?" (via Kotaku/Naver)

The shrine took 5 years and over 20,000 insects to complete. After 1975, Inamura swore he'd never make another bug statue again. I can't tell if that's a good thing or a bad thing.

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