Advertising

For centuries, women have been guzzling cranberry juice to combat painful urinary tract infections, but Time is reporting on a new study that says cranberry juice and cranberry products are completely ineffective when it comes to curing UTIs.

giphy

The new study was published in The Journal of American Medicine Association (JAMA) and lead by associate professor of medicine at Yale School of Medicine, Dr. Manisha Juthani-Mehta. For her study, Juthani-Mehta monitored a group of 147 women over the age of 65 for over a year. She administered a capsule comprised of a cranberry’s most potent components (equivalent to drinking 20 oz of cranberry juice) to half of the women, while the other half were given placebo pills. The two groups had their blood and urine tested every two months for the presence of bacteria associated with a UTI.

Advertising

The results showed that the capsules and placebo pills yielded similar results when it came to lessening the amount of bacteria in women's urine, meaning the cranberry pills are basically useless.

giphy

“My findings point in the direction that cranberry products, when studied scientifically, are not able to show real benefit for UTI," said Juthani-Mehta. She hopes the results of her study will encourage people to stop wasting money on cranberry products and instead opt for antibiotics that are already proven effective.

Advertising
A whole ocean of useless red circle fruits.
A whole ocean of useless red circle fruits.
giphy

The lore of drinking cranberry juice to prevent or treat UTIs has been passed down from female to female for generations. Seeing a fellow sister toting a huge bottle of Ocean Spray often garners sympathetic nods from those who have also felt that familiar and uncomfortable burn.

Guess we'll just have to stick to Cosmos for our cranberry juice intake from now on.