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Sarah Hörst, an assistant professor of Planetary Science at John Hopkins University, made one simple request on Twitter: for male scientists to please stop offering their unsolicited comments during question sessions, especially when they tend to explain things that everyone already knows.

And like clockwork, a bunch of men came out of the woodwork to explain why Hörst is wrong. Really, it's a stunning display.

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However, one man in particular really couldn't let the argument go.

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Paul Roundy, a professor of weather and climate variability, chimed in with, you guessed it, "not a question but a comment," explaining why this behavior has nothing to do with gender.

Other female scientists were like, "lol, no."

But still...he persisted.

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Here is the thing. Roundy is not wrong— there should always be critical discussion surrounding science. However, that is not the point Hörst is trying to make. She is specifically talking about her experience as a woman, and how males often stop her to explain things to her that she already knows. Most women are familiar with this frustrating and patronizing phenomenon.

Female scientist Dani Rabaiotti, who researches climate change, joined in the discussion to point out the obvious...

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But then Roundy started to mansplain the difference between a "discussion session" and a "question session" to her. She knows, dude. She is a scientist. She is pretty bright.

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Animal Welfare Scientist Lauren M Robinson also chimed to back up Hörst's claims in with her experience as a woman in science.

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And then Robinson totally dropped the mic.

Boom.

However, no matter how many women came forward with there eerily similar experiences, Roundy still thinks their claims are unfounded.

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Somehow, Roundy still doesn't see the irony in his statements, and these women were about out of patience.

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Here comes the grand finale.

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Whether you agree with Roundy's points or not, you have to admit that there is a cruel irony in the way he "argued" them— by bullheadedly contesting multiple female scientists on a public forum.

Also, science has confirmed that the "mansplaining" phenomenon does indeed exist. According to a study in the Journal of Language and Social Psychology, women tend to get interrupted more then men. A study done by Brigham Young University and Princeton confirmed that men take up 75% of an average meeting, and an unrelated study done in Harvard classrooms says that men are 50% more likely to "comment" on things than their female classmates. And all of this is not to mention that females only make up 21% of science professors.

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Here's a fun science experiment! Let's try listening to women when they say there is a problem rather than immediately telling them they are wrong.

Sounds crazy, I know, but taking women's concerns seriously shouldn't be the final frontier.