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Liz Meriwether, creator of the sitcom New Girl, recently wrote an essay published by The Cut about how women handle unwanted groping entitled "Laughing Until We Cry: Conversations About Getting Flashed, Grabbed, and Groped."

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The essay, inspired by the recent comments made by Donald Trump, explores why women commonly don't report instances of groping or "forcible touching" to authorities, but choose instead to share their stories with each other.

When I tell my stories to other women, I don’t have to stick to the tidy black-and-white narrative that I am a helpless victim who has fallen prey to an evil predator. For most men, anything outside that narrative sounds like a lie. Men who hear these stories, I’ve found, tend to interrogate you to get to the truth of what happened, then, if they believe you, they want retaliation or revenge. Men want rules to be enforced and authorities called. Women want those things, too, but we understand the complicated mental calculations that are forced on us: If a man reaches under your skirt on an airplane, does that mean you should put your career, your ambitions, your livelihood in jeopardy just to watch him get some kind of slap on the wrist? Isn’t that ultimately giving this stranger more power over your life? Women don’t have to explain these things to other women, because we’ve all had to ask these questions ourselves.

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Women often fear retaliation when it comes to reporting instances of sexual assault, and if you are confused as to why, look no further than the presidential election. Women who have accused Donald Trump of sexual assault have been lambasted by his supporters, called liars, and have been threatened to be sued by the Republican nominee himself. The potential backlash is enough to silence most abused women and men.

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I wish I could say my decisions not to report were heroic, but for the most part, they were selfish: I didn’t want the hassle. I wanted to keep dancing at a party. I wanted to keep getting paid to write. I did the calculation in my head and decided the best thing I could do for myself was to ignore what happened and put it away in the part of my brain that occasionally wakes me up in the middle of the night. Were those the right decisions? I genuinely don’t know. The problem is, of course, that the men involved never got into any trouble, and other men in my life or my industry or my city had no idea that any of it was happening.

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Meriwether is now urging women to stop laughing off instances of groping and start holding their assailants accountable. In a weird way, shaking off forcible touching seems almost natural, especially after years of abuse at the wandering hands of others. It shouldn't be that way. It is time for a change.

Let's do it, ladies.
Let's do it, ladies.
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You can read the essay in full here.