A 19-year-old boy has figured out how to manipulate women through their periods. And Twitter.

A 19-year-old boy has figured out how to manipulate women through their periods. And Twitter.
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Luke Buchy, a 19-year-old college student/entrepreneur from Ohio, started a delivery service that sends women comfort items when they get their period, and it's weirdly successful. The service is called "The PMS Package" and here's how it works: Customers sign up online, giving the company their credit card number and a rough estimate of their menstrual cycle. They then choose between three different box types. The "Mini Package" is $13 a month, the "Featured Package" is $25 a month, and the "Executive Box" (Oooohhh! Ahhhh!) is $35 a month. Whenever a customer's period is on the horizon, they are shipped a box filled with fun, "girly" items such as stuffed animals, nail polish, candy, and snacks. 

https://twitter.com/BriannaAudris/status/669016976015011840

The boxes are also sometimes have a theme, depending on the month they're sent.

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While the company isn't making a profit yet, they're doing pretty well. They have four employees—all under 20 years of age—and 111,000 Twitter followers. So far, they've shipped out 4,000 boxes, and plan to keep expanding. Right now, they work out of Buchy's dorm room and his parents' basement, a few hours away from campus.

According to Cosmopolitan, the reason the business is successful is because Buchy was bestowed with a very strange, specific talent by the social media gods: The ability to appeal to young women on Twitter:

"I got into the Twitter business about a year and a half ago … over that time, I have owned @cutekidvines, @sixsecondcover, @thirtysecondtuts, @worldstarvidz and more," Buchy says. These accounts are similar to the ones embedded above — they have tons of followers and appeal to a young, often female, audience.

"Currently, the only [account] I still have is @thirtysecfights (about 730,000 followers) and I sold the rest in order to free up time to be able to focus solely on my business," Buchy says.

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Buchy's explanation of his service is basically that the box serves as a subscription boyfriend:

"It's like," Buchy explains, and then pauses, "it's like, if a girl didn't have a boyfriend to cheer her up or do nice things for her when she's not feeling great, the PMS Package can be something that can provide some comfort."

Is he an unlikely ally to women? Or is this a patronizing attempt to exploit them for profit? More importantly, can you sign up for a free trial box, get free snacks, and then cancel your subscription? Even if you're a dude?

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