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Despite making up nearly half the workforce, women still have to deal with a fair share of BS when it comes to their careers. Though ladies in nearly all fields have to deal with some sexism in some form, women writers rallied on Twitter to share their particular stories about being belittled, underestimated and scrutinized in ways that men writers are not.

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It all started when Joanne Harris, the author of Chocolat, started a conversation with her followers about how many writers she knows who have given up because it was too hard to take the constant rejection.

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One woman chimed in to say she gave up writing because it was hard to balance raising a family with her career. That is when Harris argued that it is possible to be a mother and writer at the same time.

Like clockwork, a man got defensive and tweeted at Harris to tell her that men also "sacrifice interests for family."

Harris had the best answer for him:

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And thus, the #ThingsOnlyWomenWritersHear hashtag was born.

Harris started the conversation by tweeting about some of her own experiences.

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Soon, women writers flooded Twitter with stories of the sexist encounters they regularly deal with.

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It also became evident that a lot of women writers are made to answer for their husbands.

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Some men tried to sabotage the hashtag by arguing with women writers who were sharing their experiences. Thankfully, they were heavily outnumbered by people who don't suck.

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The #ThingsOnlyWomenWritersHear hashtag also inspired two other hashtags. Soon, women of color started tweeting about their unique experiences under the #WhatWoCWritersHear, and people with disabilities used the #WhatDisabledWritersHear hashtag.

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